Amazing, fascinating, bizarre are words that barely start to describe the bats of the world. Some are big and some tiny. Many have a diet of insects and fruit, yet there are others with more unusual tastes in food – such as the fisherman bat which uses its claws to catch fish and the unjustly demonized blood-eating vampire bats.

Bat expert Phil Richardson takes the reader on a guided tour of the nocturnal world of bats: where they live, … More

“To see a hare sit still as stone, to watch a hare boxing on a frosty March morning, to witness a hare bolt . . . these are great things. Every field should have a hare.’ The hare, a night creature and country-dweller, is a rare sight for most people. We know them only from legends and stories. They are shape-shifters, witches’ familiars and symbols of fertility.”

But real hares? What are they like? In The Private Life of the Hare, John Lewis-Stempel explores myths, history and … More

“And they say animals don’t have a sense of humour! Accuse me of being anthropomorphic if you must but I have had too many animal experiences not to believe that they are sentient beings with feelings and emotions.” Malcolm J Ingham worked as a Ranger & Wildlife Officer for over 30 years during which time he, along with his wife Ann, formed the Wirral Wildlife Rehabilitation Unit. Here he tells his stories, some sad, some hilarious of his efforts to become a ranger, of confronting badger diggers and assisting the Police, The National Wildlife Crime Unit & RSPCA Special Operations Unit in the battle to combat wildlife crime, particularly badger digging and baiting.

From the trials and tribulations of a badger release, chasing a deer in Birkenhead, rescuing a Saker falcon off an … More

I want to find out how they behave when they’re free. Len Howard was forty years old when she decided to leave her London life and loves behind, retire to the English countryside and devote the rest of her days to her one true passion: birds. Moving to a small cottage in Sussex, she wrote two bestselling books, astonishing the world with her observations on the tits, robins, sparrows and other birds that lived nearby, flew freely in and out of her windows, and would even perch on her shoulder as she typed.

This moving novel imagines the story of this remarkable woman’s decision to defy society’s expectations, and the joy she drew … More

Since the 1950s we have lost 63 per cent of our orchards through development or neglect, and even though we have been able to grow 3,000 varieties of apple in England, almost 70 per cent of apples we buy are imported. Common Ground has worked to interest local communities in creating and saving orchards to provide fruit and nuts, havens for wildlife and places of beauty.

The Community Orchards Handbook shows how to start your own Community Orchard, from getting support to tackling legal issues, organising … More

The wren is a paradox of a bird. On the one hand wrens are ubiquitous. They are Britain’s most common bird, with 8.5 million breeding pairs & have by far the loudest song in proportion to their size. They also thrive up & down Britain and Ireland: from the smallest city garden to remote offshore islands, blustery moors to chilly mountains. Yet many people, particularly a younger generation, are not sure if they have ever seen a wren. Perhaps because the wren is so tiny, weighing just as much as two A4 sheets of paper, & so busy, always on the move, more mouse than bird.

However if we cast our eyes back to recent history wrens were a mainstay of literary, cultural and popular history. … More