Festive cheer turns to maddening fear in this new collection of seasonal hauntings, presenting the best Christmas ghost stories from the 1850s to the 1960s. The traditional trappings of the holiday are turned upside down as restless spirits disrupt the merry games of the living, Christmas trees teem with spiteful pagan presences and the Devil himself treads the boards at the village pantomime.

As the cold night of winter closes in and the glow of the hearth begins to flicker and fade, the … More

Uncovering the history of the tattoo in classic fiction for the first time, this original selection depicts the tattoo as a catalyst for scandal in society, as a symbol for an unknowable supernatural force, and as transcendent living art merging the spirits of a tattooer and his or her living canvas. Featuring previously hidden works from the pages of rare literary magazines such as “The Starfish Tattoo” alongside such classics of the genre as Tanizaki’s “The Tattooer” and Saki’s “The Background,” this exploration of the tattoo in fiction is guaranteed to leave an indelible impression.

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A splash of something huge resounds through the sea-fog. In the stillness of a dark room, some unspeakable evil is making its approach. This new selection offers the most chilling and unsettling of Hodgson’s short fiction, from encounters with abominations at sea to fireside tales of otherworldly forces from his inventive `occult detective’ character Carnacki, the ghost finder.

A master of conjuring atmosphere, when the horror inevitably arrives it is delivered with breathtaking pace and the author’s unique … More

The reputation of early-twentieth century British writer Algernon Blackwood currently resides with his two novellas `The Willows’ (1907) and `The Wendigo’ (1910), and with good reason. They are perfectly crafted horror tales that convey feelings of mystical otherness; they hint at the possibility that there are forces which lie beyond the confines of our everyday understanding of the world and which may, given the right circumstances, manifest to humans. In `The Willows’, `unearthly’ creatures are responsible for arousing `some dim ancestral sense of terror more profoundly disturbing than anything’ the protagonists have ever known.

In `The Wendigo’, fear of the titular monster from Native American folklore is used to create a discombobulating atmosphere of … More