In the early 90s a handful of people concerned with the crisis of homelessness & joblessness among the young started the Foyer movement in Britain. They were influenced by the experience of their equivalents in France & Germany who had developed what the French call Foyers de Jeunes Travailleurs as an ‘integrated approach to meeting the needs of young people during their transition from dependence to independence by linking affordable accommodation to training & employment’.

By 1997 there were 46 Foyers operating in the UK with a further 32 due to open during the year … More

Born OTD in 1876, John Griffith London, AKA Jack London. The People of the Abyss is a book by Jack London about life in the East End of London in 1902. He wrote this first-hand account after living in the East End for several weeks, sometimes staying in workhouses or sleeping on the streets. In his attempt to understand the working-class of this deprived area of London the author stayed as a lodger with a poor family. The conditions he experienced and wrote about were the same as those endured by an estimated 500,000 of the contemporary London poor.

As well as being a literary masterpiece, The People of the Abyss stands as a major sociological study. While other … More

In the first global overview of philosophy, Baggini travels the world to provide a wide-ranging map of human thought. One of the great unexplained wonders of human history is that written philosophy flowered entirely separately in China, India and Ancient Greece at more or less the same time. These early philosophies have had a profound impact on the development of distinctive cultures in different parts of the world.

What we call ‘philosophy’ in the West is not even half the story. Julian Baggini sets out to expand our … More

Walking up Quarry Street, Albert felt a huge surge of pride. His first pay packet. He’d earned it all himself. His heart nearly burst out of his chest as he placed the money on the kitchen table in front of his mother. She picked it up, smiled briefly, and then said, ‘It’s not a lot, but it’ll do.” Their parents worked as miners & lace workers, but by the mid-20th century new opportunities beckoned for the children of the Midlands.

Derek, Betty, Albert, Pauline, Doreen and Bob came from families where every penny counted. Education meant sacrifice, and even children … More