Born OTD in 1934, Gladstone ‘Gladdy’ Anderson. “Gladdy”, was a Jamaican pianist, keyboard player, and singer, who played a major part in the island’s musical history, playing a key role in defining the ska sound and the rocksteady beat, and playing on hundreds of recordings as a session musician, a solo artist, and as leader of Gladdy’s All Stars.

“..And I hear Gladdy Anderson who was on piano say, ‘this one rock steady, you know. This one a rock … More

Fantastic gems in the shuffle, blues and ballad style from the early years of Studio One and Jamaican music. An amazing double LP package of titles, both well known and obscure, produced by Coxsone Dodd between 1960 and 1962. Includes such classics as Theo Beckford’s Easy Snapping, Alton (Ellis) and Eddie (Perkins) Muriel, Owen Gray’s On The Beach, Don Drummond’s This Man Is Back and many, many more from the foundation artists at Studio One.

The late 50’s and early 60’s witnessed the rise of the Jamaican record producer, of whom none were more popular … More

The saying don’t judge a book by it’s cover should also apply to this album. ‘Red Red Wine’ is a compilation album compiled by the Jamaican producer Brother Dan, better known by his stage name Dandy. The album consists of some of his most popular productions like Tony Tribe’s “Red Red Wine” and Israelites “Games People Play”. The reggae version of the Neil Diamond title song became a hit in the UK in the summer of 69. With his own showcase label ‘DownTown’, Dandy entered the music world, including his popular release ‘Reggae In Your Jeggae’.

Originally produced by Trojan Records in 1969. This repressed album is available as a limited edition of 750 individually numbered … More

1969 proved a pivotal year for Trojan and reggae as a whole. In the month’s following the company’s launch the previous summer, it was fast becoming a major force on the British music scene, its success propelled by the spending power of a new, powerful demographic that was successfully bringing reggae into the mainstream consciousness. Considered by many to be the best Trojan compilation LP.

Trojan released a 12 track budget-priced set that would become an era defining collection and one of the most popular … More

From the late, great, Ranking Roger of The Beat, comes his autobiography from the same name of their album – ‘I Just Can’t Stop It : My Life in the Beat’. This is the story of one of the UK’s biggest 2-Tone bands, The Beat, who at the height of their fame in the early 80’s, had three top-selling UK albums & like The Specials, epitomized the 2-tone multi-racial approach to music & life in urban Britain. The story begins in 1979, when 16 year-old Birmingham school boy Roger – a punk fan – was invited to appear on stage at a local pub with the newly formed ska band, The Beat.

Roger’s energetic style and Jamaican-influenced vocals, paired with Dave Wakeling’s angelic pop vocals, immediately distinguished the band from the other … More

Born OTD in 1938, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer, Cecil Bustamente Campbell, AKA Prince Buster. Campbell became more actively involved in the operational side of running a sound system after he was introduced to Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd, a musically inclined businessman who operated one of Kingston’s most popular sound systems. Campbell found himself fulfilling a variety of roles for Coxsone: providing security, handling ticket receipts, identifying & sourcing music as well as working in the essential role of selector. The knowledge he gained about the financial & logistical aspects of staging a sound system dance was put to good use when Campbell made the decision to start his own sound system called ‘Voice of the People’

Mind-boggling discography devoted to the Jamaican releases of Prince Buster’s productions from 1961’s Oh Carolina by the Folkes Brothers to … More

Born OTD in 1943, saxaphonist with The Soul Vendors, (AKA Soul Dimension), & The Skatalites, Cedric “Im” Brooks. Brooks became a pupil at the renowned Alpha Boys School aged 11, where he learned music theory and clarinet. In his late teens he took up tenor saxophone and flute.

One of the most intriguing, eccentric and original musicians to emerge from reggae is Cedric ‘I’M’ Brooks, the tenor saxophonist … More

Born OTD in 1947, Neville O’Riley Livingston, AKA Bunny Wailer. Jamaican singer songwriter, percussionist and was an original member of The Wailing Wailers. “The sufferation singles of that time threw up some true classics: Horace Andy’s ‘Skylarking’ was about the perils of a hardcore, unemployed sub-working-class; The Maytals’ ‘Time Tough’, subtly juxtaposed slavery with current hardships; Bunny Wailer’s ‘Arab Oil Weapon’ pulled few punches…”

The first major account of the history of reggae, black music journalist Lloyd Bradley describes its origins and development in … More