In this lovely collection of previously unpublished essays, the late, celebrated author and neurologist Sacks (The River of Consciousness) muses on his career, his youth, the mental health field, and much more. Readers will learn of influences that molded Sacks’s brilliant mind, from the cephalopod specimens at the Natural History Museum in London to the “visionary, mystical” 19th-century scientist Humphry Davy, whom Sacks dubs the “Poet of Chemistry.”

Of the many remarkable essays on medical conditions, “Travels with Lowell” stands out for its sensitivity and nuance, as Sacks … More

“Ordinary is what most people are and I am not. I am not ordinary at all. I am a scientist. One stormy night, a group of villagers are struck by lightning. The only survivor is a baby – Mary Anning. From that moment on, a spark is lit within her. Growing up poor but proud on the windswept Dorset coast, Mary follows after her father, hunting for fossils uncovered by waves & landslips: ancient creatures, turned to stone. Ignoring other people’s taunts, Mary faces danger to bring back valuable treasures to help feed her family. But tragedy and despair is never far away..

Mary must depend upon her unique courage and knowledge to fulfil her dream of becoming a scientist in a time … More

Born OTD in 1879, German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics), Albert Einstein. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. This book is a collection of letters, articles and essays, all by Einstein, on various social issues to which he devoted his spare time: pacifism; internationalism and world government; human rights and civil rights; humanism; socialism; and opposition to nationalism, capitalism, militarism, fascism, and weapons of mass destruction

Organized into six sections by topic, it opens with a brief biographical sketch, chronology, and introductions to the documents by … More

Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) is the great lost scientist – more things are named after him than anyone else. There are towns, rivers, mountain ranges, the ocean current that runs along the South American coast, there’s a penguin, a giant squid – even the Mare Humboldtianum on the moon.

His colourful adventures read like something out of a Boy’s Own story: Humboldt explored deep into the rainforest, climbed the … More