Orange Street has a mystical place in Reggae’s history. Set in the heart of downtown Kingston, Jamaica. Even to this day it stands somehow locked in time & space. The beat of the music ever changing & evolving. As politics, religion even the weather effect its course one thing remains a constant, Orange Street is central to the islands musical story. The Ska era of Jamaica’s sound time has told us can be dated from around 1962 to late 1966. The instigators being the big three producers of this period, Clement Coxonne Dodd, Prince Buster & Duke Reid.

The Rocksteady sound which ran a shorter more intense race between 1966 to 1968 would be Duke Reid’s to command.. … More

While Montego Bay natives Jackie Bernard, his brother Footy Bernard and cousin Lloyd Kerr recorded under various guises in the early ’60s, their collective arrival as The Kingstonians in 1967 marked a sea change not only in the vocal trio’s productivity and popularity, but also in the emerging Reggae sound. The Kingstonians made several chart-topping singles between 1968 and 1970, including the massive hit “Singer Man” whose success ultimately led to the release of their sole LP, Sufferer.

Originally issued on Trojan, Sufferer collects a dozen of The Kingstonians’ best-known songs. Produced by Derrick Harriott, these truly boss … More

Born OTD in 1940, Jamaican musical artist popular in the 1960s and 1970s, Derrick Morgan. In 1959, Morgan entered the recording studio for the first time. Duke Reid, the sound system boss, was looking for talent to record for his Treasure Isle record label. Morgan cut two popular shuffle-boogie sides “Lover Boy”, a.k.a. “S-Corner Rock”, and “Oh My”. Soon after, Morgan cut the bolero-tinged boogie “Fat Man”, which also became a hit. He also found time to record for Coxsone Dodd. In 1960 Morgan became the only artist ever to fill the places from one to seven on the Jamaican pop chart simultaneously.

Secret records are releasing a compilation of early tracks from the only artist ever to fill the places from one … More

Jamaican love songs always came across as heartfelt poetry whether they conveyed a broken heart, unrequited love or even the message, “it’s all over don’t bother to come back” anecdotes. But whatever the mood the singers of these songs were so good and versatile that putting such subject matter over in a few verses was always so moving and believable. Jamaican love songs were a constant in the ever-evolving sounds and journey that reggae music took its listeners on, from ska to rocksteady to the early reggae sounds of the late 1960s early 1970s.

Kingston Sounds have complied a great selection of songs that all deal with that timeless subject matter. New vinyl LP … More

In the early 1960s, when the Jamaican recording industry was still very much in its infancy, the local music scene was dominated by a mere handful of performers. Among these musical pioneers was Derrick Morgan. A year after the launch of the islands records label (1967), they released the Derrick Morgan And Friends LP, which has since become a highly prized collector’s item.

Recorded at Jamaica’s premier recording studio, WIRL, and featuring the musicianship of leading session crews, the Carib Beats and Lyn … More

Having dominated the rock steady era, Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid was searching for a way to build upon his standing as one of Jamaica’s premiere record producers following the arrival of the new reggae sound towards the close of the Sixties. By releasing Gay Jamaica Independence Time he proved that he still released high-quality tracks.

Some of the most talented musicians from that period are featured on this record, like U-Roy, The Ethiopians, Alton Ellis, … More

Eastwood Rides Again follows the theme of Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry & The Upsetters previous classic, Return of Django – and like that one, the groove isn’t just the rocksteady rhythms you’d expect – but also maybe this more spacious version of the style. They got their funk on with the inspiration of Spaghetti Westerns and soul music. The record is largely instrumental and its a representation of Perry’s significant production skills.

Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry was a pioneer in the 1970s development of dub music and worked together with artists such as … More

The famous Jamaican record producer Duke Reid founded record label Treasure Isle in the 1960s. Some of his best production skills can be found on the compilation album Here Comes The Duke. Showcasing the talents of some of the giants of the rock steady era, the recordings, all issued during the latter half of ’68, demonstrate just why the Duke is widely regarded as the king of the rock steady sound.

The famous Jamaican record producer Duke Reid founded record label Treasure Isle in the 1960s. Some of his best production … More

Orange Street has a mystical place in Reggae’s history. Set in the heart of downtown Kingston, Jamaica. Even to this day it stands somehow locked in time and space. The beat of the music ever changing and evolving. As politics, religion even the weather effect its course one thing remains a constant, Orange Street is central to the islands musical story. The Ska era of Jamaica’s sound time has told us can be dated from around 1962 to late 1966.

The instigators being the big three producers of this period, Clement Coxonne Dodd, Prince Buster and Duke Reid. Prince Busters … More

Dave Barker possesses a set of pipes that, if he had hailed from Chicago or Memphis instead of Jamaica would likely have seen him regarded as one of the great soul men. As a Jamaican, he actually achieved international fame in 1970 with his mad outburst on the Winston Riley produced Double Barrell, a huge hit in the UK, a portion of whose teenage population was at that time in the throes of the original skinhead fashion, of which reggae was a part.

Ansell Collins was a session keyboard player responsible for the effervescent fairground sound on that record, and many others during … More