Coming soon! Pre-order here. As one of Jamaica’s leading record producers Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid embraced the new reggae sound. London- based reggae giant Trojan Records brought together a dozen of his finest works under the title “Greater Jamaica Moonwalk Reggae”. If features many of the biggest Jamaican hits from 1969 to 1970. Tommy McCook & The Supersonics is one of the main artists to be found on this record. The 12 tracks bringing the best Jamaica had to offer during the heydays of their musical days. Greater Jamaica Moonwalk Reggae is available as a limited edition of 750.

Pre-order vinyl LP here.

Coming soon, pre-order here. Jamaican singer Marcia Griffiths’ ‘Sweet And Nice’ reissued on 2 x LP. Kingston songstress Marcia Griffiths’ 1974 debut album Sweet And Nice is being reissued on double vinyl, via Be With Records this August. Though the album has been released under various names and iterations, Be With is presenting it in its original form, remastered from the studio tapes. Its 21 tracks include the 14 songs from Sweet And Nice on the first LP, alongside 7 rare cuts on the second LP.

Pre-order double vinyl LP here.

On 22 July 1969, the world celebrated mankind’s first steps upon the surface of the moon with the successful Apollo 11 landing. And in no country was this historic event more celebrated musically than Jamaica, where an array of local recording artists penned and cut songs to mark the occasion. Now, in honour of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, a dozen of the most popular and sought-after moon-themed reggae tracks from the period have been gathered on this celebratory LP. The result is a joyous collection of original boss reggae sounds, sure to appeal to fans of late 1960s Jamaican music, collectors of space oddities and the curious, drawn to the irresistible pleasures of lunar reggae!

New vinyl LP available in store and online.

The late Winston Riley formed the Techniques in 1962 and remained a member of the group throughout their career. Regarded as one of the finest harmony groups in the music’s history, The Techniques included at one time or another such great singers as Slim Smith, Pat Kelly, Lloyd Parks, Bruce Ruffin, Jackie Parris, Tyrone Evans and Dave Barker.

The group recorded such classics as You Don’t Care, Queen Majesty and Love Is Not A Gamble for Duke Reid … More

The Rude Boy moniker has its roots firmly set in the downtown districts of Kingston, Jamaica. Alongside the regular Ska/ Rocksteady sounds coming out of the sound systems, there was an undercurrent theme to some songs that spoke of the struggles of the youth, of their confrontation, arrests and run-ins with the establishment. Some of these songs praised the Rude Boys for their stance and style while other songs were more in contempt with the rude boy’s attitudes, comings, goings and violent behaviour. Some of the runnings that did not help their standing with their elders’ was that not only did they get employed by sound system operators to help keep their dance safe but also to disrupt competitors dances, a job that also gave them the name dancehall crasher. Where music leads fashion is never far behind and the rude boys were no exception. The look favoured, sharp suits, thin ties, pork pie or Trilby hats and stylish shoes.

The British not only took on the music, but also the look of the rude boy as the styles moved … More

He started as a calypso singer in Trinidad under the stage name Lord Creator & recorded his first hits, “The Cockhead” & “Evening News”, in Trinidad in 1958 & 1959 respectively with Fitz Vaughan Bryan’s big band. Due to the success of his hit “Evening News” which was released in Trinidad on the Cook label and also in the UK on the Melodisc label, he moved to Jamaica in the late 1959 to perform & record & decided to settle there. In 1962, he recorded “Independent Jamaica” with producer Vincent “Randy” Chin, which became the official song marking Jamaica’s independence from the British Empire on 6 August 1962. That song was also the first record on Chris Blackwell’s newly founded Island Records label in the UK. In 1963, “Don’t Stay Out Late”, produced by Chin, became a hit in Jamaica.

Vinyl LP available in store & online.

Born OTD in 1934, Gladstone ‘Gladdy’ Anderson. “Gladdy”, was a Jamaican pianist, keyboard player, and singer, who played a major part in the island’s musical history, playing a key role in defining the ska sound and the rocksteady beat, and playing on hundreds of recordings as a session musician, a solo artist, and as leader of Gladdy’s All Stars.

“..And I hear Gladdy Anderson who was on piano say, ‘this one rock steady, you know. This one a rock … More

Follow up to the Reggae Girl compilation Germany’s Grover Supreme issued a year or so back, covering similar vintage “boss reggae” vocals and instumentals from the late sixties produced by A. G. Murphy. A definite scorcher from The Tennors – a set that’s overflowing with soulful harmonies from the rocksteady trio – and which also includes a few cuts by choice contemporaries as well!

The rhythms here are in the best late 60s Kingston modes – plenty of pre-reggae soulful sounds from Jamaica, with … More

The saying don’t judge a book by it’s cover should also apply to this album. ‘Red Red Wine’ is a compilation album compiled by the Jamaican producer Brother Dan, better known by his stage name Dandy. The album consists of some of his most popular productions like Tony Tribe’s “Red Red Wine” and Israelites “Games People Play”. The reggae version of the Neil Diamond title song became a hit in the UK in the summer of 69. With his own showcase label ‘DownTown’, Dandy entered the music world, including his popular release ‘Reggae In Your Jeggae’.

Originally produced by Trojan Records in 1969. This repressed album is available as a limited edition of 750 individually numbered … More

Another classic album release from Sunspot. This one originally appeared on Trojan’s High Note subsidiary set up to license the productions of Sonia Pottinger. The Hippy Boys were a studio band comprising of the Barrett Brothers, later of The Upsetters and The Wailers celebrated bass & Drum axis, supplemented by keyboardist Glen Adams and guitarist Reggae Alva Lewis. This instrumental album showcases the typical reggae sound of the day and includes perhaps the groups most celebrated single track as The Hippy Boys; Reggae Pressure, retitled inexplicably on this album as Spicy.

New vinyl LP available in store and online.