Orange Street has a mystical place in Reggae’s history. Set in the heart of downtown Kingston, Jamaica. Even to this day it stands somehow locked in time and space. The beat of the music ever changing and evolving. As politics, religion even the weather effect its course one thing remains a constant, Orange Street is central to the islands musical story. The Ska era of Jamaica’s sound time has told us can be dated from around 1962 to late 1966.

The instigators being the big three producers of this period, Clement Coxonne Dodd, Prince Buster and Duke Reid. Prince Busters … More

Dave Barker possesses a set of pipes that, if he had hailed from Chicago or Memphis instead of Jamaica would likely have seen him regarded as one of the great soul men. As a Jamaican, he actually achieved international fame in 1970 with his mad outburst on the Winston Riley produced Double Barrell, a huge hit in the UK, a portion of whose teenage population was at that time in the throes of the original skinhead fashion, of which reggae was a part.

Ansell Collins was a session keyboard player responsible for the effervescent fairground sound on that record, and many others during … More

Pat Kelly out of all the Jamaican singers was influenced most by the voice of American soul singer Sam Cooke. As were indeed many of the singers from that time, few however could carry out this daunting task as well as Pat Kelly. His delivery was perfect and so was his ability to carry any song that came his way.

For this release we have focused on material that Mr. Kelly had recorded with legendary Jamaican producer Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee. … More

Once in a while, a man comes along who has the talent not only within one field, but many fields. Lee Perry is such a man. Singer, songwriter and producer. This album is a showcase for what this man is trying to say with his music. Defying convention time and again, Lee has spearheaded musical taste in Jamaica and once again, he comes up with new sounds and dances on this album… The Upsetter.

Classic Trojan album now reissued on vinyl. Originally released in 1969. Heavyweight 180gm vinyl. Available in store and online.

Half a century ago, vast numbers of British working-class youths adopted a style that reflected both their attitude and tastes. Dubbed by the country’s media as ‘skinhead’, the look starkly contrasted with that of the country’s largely middle-class ‘hippy’ population, drawing heavily on the smart, practical & stylish fashions introduced to the UK by the Windrush generation. The Caribbean influence was even more evident in the music that provided the soundtrack to the skinhead scene: reggae. To finally set the record straight about this greatly mis-understood sub-culture, celebrated writers, Paul ‘Smiler’ Anderson & Mark Baxter have penned a brand new book, Scorcha! Skins, Suedes & style from the Streets – 1967 to 1973.

In addition, the pair have also compiled a companion 7” vinyl box set of the same title, comprising ten 45s, … More

Soon come. Showcasing the very best of Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle late rock steady and early reggae productions, Moonlight Groover is today regarded as an essential requirement for all serious fans of late Sixties Jamaican sounds. A best seller for Trojan in 1970, the collection features numerous major Jamaican hits from such celebrated performers as John Holt, Joya Landis, Alton Ellis and Tommy McCook, and is also notable for the sleeve artwork featuring Trojan’s own Tilly Vidal on the front cover.

Available as a limited edition of 750 individually numbered copies on orange coloured vinyl. Pre-order here.

An oral history of the UK’s soundsystem culture, featuring interviews with Dubmaster Dennis Bovell, Skream, Youth, Norman Jay, Adrian Sherwood, Mala, & others. In the years following the arrival of the Windrush generation, the UK’s soundsystem culture would become the most important influence on contemporary pop music since rock n roll. Pumped through towering, home-built speakers, often directly onto the thronged streets of events like the Notting Hill Carnival, the pulsating bass lines of reggae, dub, rave, jungle, trip hop, dubstep, & grime have shaped the worlds of several generations of British youth culture but have often been overlooked by historians obsessed with swinging London, punk, & Britpop.

This oral history, consisting of new interviews conducted by respected dance music writer Joe Muggs, and accompanied by dramatic portraits … More