Jamaican love songs always came across as heartfelt poetry whether they conveyed a broken heart, unrequited love or even the message, “it’s all over don’t bother to come back” anecdotes. But whatever the mood the singers of these songs were so good and versatile that putting such subject matter over in a few verses was always so moving and believable. Jamaican love songs were a constant in the ever-evolving sounds and journey that reggae music took its listeners on, from ska to rocksteady to the early reggae sounds of the late 1960s early 1970s.

Kingston Sounds have complied a great selection of songs that all deal with that timeless subject matter. New vinyl LP … More

In the early 1960s, when the Jamaican recording industry was still very much in its infancy, the local music scene was dominated by a mere handful of performers. Among these musical pioneers was Derrick Morgan. A year after the launch of the islands records label (1967), they released the Derrick Morgan And Friends LP, which has since become a highly prized collector’s item.

Recorded at Jamaica’s premier recording studio, WIRL, and featuring the musicianship of leading session crews, the Carib Beats and Lyn … More

Having dominated the rock steady era, Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid was searching for a way to build upon his standing as one of Jamaica’s premiere record producers following the arrival of the new reggae sound towards the close of the Sixties. By releasing Gay Jamaica Independence Time he proved that he still released high-quality tracks.

Some of the most talented musicians from that period are featured on this record, like U-Roy, The Ethiopians, Alton Ellis, … More

Orange Street has a mystical place in Reggae’s history. Set in the heart of downtown Kingston, Jamaica. Even to this day it stands somehow locked in time and space. The beat of the music ever changing and evolving. As politics, religion even the weather effect its course one thing remains a constant, Orange Street is central to the islands musical story. The Ska era of Jamaica’s sound time has told us can be dated from around 1962 to late 1966.

The instigators being the big three producers of this period, Clement Coxonne Dodd, Prince Buster and Duke Reid. Prince Busters … More

Dave Barker possesses a set of pipes that, if he had hailed from Chicago or Memphis instead of Jamaica would likely have seen him regarded as one of the great soul men. As a Jamaican, he actually achieved international fame in 1970 with his mad outburst on the Winston Riley produced Double Barrell, a huge hit in the UK, a portion of whose teenage population was at that time in the throes of the original skinhead fashion, of which reggae was a part.

Ansell Collins was a session keyboard player responsible for the effervescent fairground sound on that record, and many others during … More

Pat Kelly out of all the Jamaican singers was influenced most by the voice of American soul singer Sam Cooke. As were indeed many of the singers from that time, few however could carry out this daunting task as well as Pat Kelly. His delivery was perfect and so was his ability to carry any song that came his way.

For this release we have focused on material that Mr. Kelly had recorded with legendary Jamaican producer Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee. … More

Once in a while, a man comes along who has the talent not only within one field, but many fields. Lee Perry is such a man. Singer, songwriter and producer. This album is a showcase for what this man is trying to say with his music. Defying convention time and again, Lee has spearheaded musical taste in Jamaica and once again, he comes up with new sounds and dances on this album… The Upsetter.

Classic Trojan album now reissued on vinyl. Originally released in 1969. Heavyweight 180gm vinyl. Available in store and online.