Midhat Kamal – dreamer, romantic, aesthete – leaves Palestine in 1914 to study medicine in France, under the tutelage of Dr Molineu. He falls deeply in love with Jeannette, the doctor’s daughter. But Midhat soon discovers that everything is fragile: love turns to loss, friends become enemies and everyone is looking for a place to belong.

Through Midhat’s eyes we see the tangled politics and personal tragedies of a turbulent era – the Palestinian struggle for … More

Aged eight, Dina Nayeri fled Iran along with her mother and brother, and lived in the crumbling shell of an Italian hotel-turned-refugee camp. Eventually she was granted asylum in America. Now, Nayeri weaves together her own vivid story with those of other asylum seekers in recent years. In these pages, women gather to prepare the noodles that remind them of home, a closeted queer man tries to make his case truthfully as he seeks asylum and a translator attempts to help new arrivals present their stories to officials.

Surprising and provocative, The Ungrateful Refugee recalibrates the conversation around the refugee experience. Here are the real human stories of … More

The UK government proudly calls the aim of its immigration policy to be the creation of a “hostile environment,” while refugees drown in the Mediterranean & Britain votes to leave the EU against claims that “swarms” of migrants are entering Britain. Meanwhile, study after study confirms that immigration is not damaging the UK’s economy, nor putting a strain on public services, but immigration is blamed for all of Britain’s ills. Yet concerns about immigration are deemed “legitimate” across the political spectrum, with few exceptions.

How did we get here? Maya Goodfellow offers a compelling answer. Through interviews with leading policy-makers, asylum seekers, and immigration … More

OTD in 1982, from approximately 18:00 on 16 September to 08:00 on 18 September 1982, a widespread massacre was carried out by the militia under the eyes of their Israeli allies which resulted in the killing of between 460 and 3,500 civilians. Travel writer Peter Mortimer reports on Shatila, the Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon – scene of the Shatila massacre of 1982, now home to about 12,000 people living in one square kilometre. The author developed a children’s theatre group in the camp, whose members will be visiting the UK around publication.

Shatila is a Palestinian refugee camp in outer Beirut, home to 17,000 people existing in an area the size of … More

To commemorate the second anniversary of the death of Alan Kurdi, the three-year-old Syrian boy who drowned while attempting to reach Greece in 2015, the author Khaled Hosseini, has written Sea Prayer. This imagined letter is written in the form of a monologue, delivered by a Syrian father to the son lying asleep in his lap, on the eve of their sea crossing to Europe.

On a moonlit beach a father cradles his sleeping son as they wait for dawn to break and a boat … More

Adam & his family flee Syria & arrive at the Shatila refugee camp in Beirut. Conditions in this overcrowded Palestinian camp are tough, & violence defines many of the relationships: a father fights to save his daughter, a gang leader plots to expand his influence, & drugs break up a family. Adam struggles to make sense of his refugee experience, but then he meets Shatha & starts to view the camp through her eyes.

Most novels are written by professionals using second hand material. Not this one. The editors have taken nine refugees, taught … More