Born OTD in 1945, keyboardist best known for his work with the Small Faces & the Faces, Ian McLagan. The band is remembered as one of the most acclaimed and influential mod groups of the 1960s. With memorable hit songs and one of rock’s first concept albums, they later evolved into one of the UK’s most successful psychedelic acts before disbanding in 1969. Lane, Jones and McLagan would later form The Faces with Rod Stewart and Ron Wood.

From the Beginning was the (unofficial) retrospective album released in June 1967. It’s a mix of A-sides, first album outtakes … More

You must have wondered how it all began with the Jamaican beat music called Ska. Let’s set the records straight, it was “Duke” Reid from Western Kingston who developed this beat based on the indigenous music of Jamaica. It was way back in 1952 and then “Duke” called it ‘Rhythm ‘n Blues’. Exciting, hypnotic, a mixture of Jamaican folk music and rock ‘n roll. Duke Reid, lover of music and the deep rolling rhythms of his Jamaican people heard the beat develop from watching his people dance.

He got himself an amplified “Sound system” and while hiring it out for dances, he listened and he watched, on … More

While Montego Bay natives Jackie Bernard, his brother Footy Bernard and cousin Lloyd Kerr recorded under various guises in the early ’60s, their collective arrival as The Kingstonians in 1967 marked a sea change not only in the vocal trio’s productivity and popularity, but also in the emerging Reggae sound. The Kingstonians made several chart-topping singles between 1968 and 1970, including the massive hit “Singer Man” whose success ultimately led to the release of their sole LP, Sufferer.

Originally issued on Trojan, Sufferer collects a dozen of The Kingstonians’ best-known songs. Produced by Derrick Harriott, these truly boss … More

Jamaican love songs always came across as heartfelt poetry whether they conveyed a broken heart, unrequited love or even the message, “it’s all over don’t bother to come back” anecdotes. But whatever the mood the singers of these songs were so good and versatile that putting such subject matter over in a few verses was always so moving and believable. Jamaican love songs were a constant in the ever-evolving sounds and journey that reggae music took its listeners on, from ska to rocksteady to the early reggae sounds of the late 1960s early 1970s.

Kingston Sounds have complied a great selection of songs that all deal with that timeless subject matter. New vinyl LP … More

In the early 1960s, when the Jamaican recording industry was still very much in its infancy, the local music scene was dominated by a mere handful of performers. Among these musical pioneers was Derrick Morgan. A year after the launch of the islands records label (1967), they released the Derrick Morgan And Friends LP, which has since become a highly prized collector’s item.

Recorded at Jamaica’s premier recording studio, WIRL, and featuring the musicianship of leading session crews, the Carib Beats and Lyn … More

Having dominated the rock steady era, Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid was searching for a way to build upon his standing as one of Jamaica’s premiere record producers following the arrival of the new reggae sound towards the close of the Sixties. By releasing Gay Jamaica Independence Time he proved that he still released high-quality tracks.

Some of the most talented musicians from that period are featured on this record, like U-Roy, The Ethiopians, Alton Ellis, … More

Eastwood Rides Again follows the theme of Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry & The Upsetters previous classic, Return of Django – and like that one, the groove isn’t just the rocksteady rhythms you’d expect – but also maybe this more spacious version of the style. They got their funk on with the inspiration of Spaghetti Westerns and soul music. The record is largely instrumental and its a representation of Perry’s significant production skills.

Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry was a pioneer in the 1970s development of dub music and worked together with artists such as … More

The famous Jamaican record producer Duke Reid founded record label Treasure Isle in the 1960s. Some of his best production skills can be found on the compilation album Here Comes The Duke. Showcasing the talents of some of the giants of the rock steady era, the recordings, all issued during the latter half of ’68, demonstrate just why the Duke is widely regarded as the king of the rock steady sound.

The famous Jamaican record producer Duke Reid founded record label Treasure Isle in the 1960s. Some of his best production … More

Back in stock, Spirit of ’69 -The Boss Reggae Sevens Collection. Interest in original ‘boss reggae’ music from the late sixties and early seventies has rarely been greater and in response to public demand we present ‘Spirit Of ‘69’: a deluxe 7” singles box set comprising faithful reproductions of eight of the most sought-after 45s in the style. Compiled and annotated by skinhead authority Michael De Koningh, the collection is presented in a strikingly designed box, with each of the discs mastered from the best available source and pressed on the highest quality vinyl. All of the records are housed in a card sleeve that replicates those manufactured by Trojan during the original era, while the set also includes a stylish card insert, featuring eye-catching imagery and a fascinating essay on the original ‘boss reggae’ sound and each of the singles.

With original copies of all eight discs in the collection now exchanging hands for three figure sums, ‘Spirit Of 69’ … More

In the late 1960s, Decca was playing to its strengths – mass marketing classical and easy-listening recordings just as it had been doing since the late 1920s. In April of 1968, Decca entered into a venture that would see its repertoire prominently displayed by non-specialist retailers, and after much resistance, it moved into the world of budget releases, with the beginning of its much loved ‘The World Of’ series in 1968.

The World Of series acted as perfect primers, and the price put it at almost half the price of full-price … More