Born OTD in 1922, American novelist and poet, Jack Kerouac. Kerouac is recognized for his method of spontaneous prose. Thematically, his work covers topics such as Catholic spirituality, jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel. “A young innocent, joins his hero Dean Moriarty, a traveller and mystic, the living epitome of Beat, on a breathless, exuberant ride back and forth across the United States. Their hedonistic search for release or fulfilment through drink, sex, drugs and jazz becomes an exploration of personal freedom, a test of the limits of the American dream..”

A brilliant blend of fiction and autobiography, Jack Kerouac’s exhilarating novel swings to the rhythms of 1950s underground America, racing … More

Long recognized as a poet of radiant fury, of lament, and of refusal, Sean Bonney was a modern-day Blake whose poetry reminds us what matters. Our Death, his latest and long awaited first US collection, is full of poems of militant despair that refuse any capitulation to the worldview of the enemy. These poems wander the hinterlands of our absolutely endangered cities, chart the aftermath of the collapse of the social movements of the early part of the decade, and pay homage to the Greek anarchist poet Katerina Gogou.

Available in store and online.

Born OTD in 1955, poet and playwright, Carol Ann Duffy. She is a professor of contemporary poetry & was the first woman, the first Scottish-born poet, and the first LGBT poet to hold the position. Her poems address issues such as oppression, gender, and violence in an accessible language that has made them popular in schools.

Carol Ann Duffy’s new Christmas poem, Frost Fair is inspired by the fairs held on the River Thames in London … More

It is a snowy London day in The Great Winter of 1683. We follow our bold narrator as she explores `the town on the Thames’, a thousand tents and dancing fires lit on the frozen water with jubilant residents and lively festive revelry. All is a fete upon the ice as she sees jugglers, dancing bears, palm readers and even a merry wedding. Her journey leads her to meet many new companions with whom to spend a starry night upon the river, where they sleep with no inkling of who will be looking down on them in the morning light . . .

Carol Ann Duffy’s new Christmas poem, Frost Fair is inspired by the fairs held on the River Thames in London … More

Born OTD in 1757, English poet, painter, and printmaker, William Blake. His poetry consistently embodies an attitude of rebellion against the abuse of class power as documented in David Erdman’s large study Blake: Prophet Against Empire: A Poet’s Interpretation of the History of His Own Times. Blake was concerned about senseless wars & the blighting effects of the Industrial Revolution. Much of his poetry recounts in symbolic allegory the effects of the French and American revolutions. Erdman claims Blake was disillusioned with them, believing they had simply replaced monarchy with irresponsible mercantilism and notes Blake was deeply opposed to slavery, and believes some of his poems read primarily as championing “free love” have had their anti-slavery implications short-changed.

Peter Marshall’s study draws on Blake’s complete writings, his poetry and his prose. It offers a lively and perceptive account … More

Working-class artists continue to be hugely underrepresented in the arts industries, though they make up a third of the British population. These professions are already notoriously hard to get into, but working class artists face extra challenges, from unpaid work reinforcing social disparity, to prejudice. How do we break this cycle of inequality in the arts? In Smashing It, leading musicians, playwrights, visual artists, filmmakers and writers share how they overcame obstacles, from the financial to the philosophical, to make it in the arts.

Edited by acclaimed poet and playwright Sabrina Mahfouz, it celebrates the achievements of working class artists in Britain, from the … More

Marking Stephanie Gaunt’s 70th Birthday, this collection of her poems evokes memories of an unusual childhood and explores a full and eventful life. Raised by eccentric parents in a household of dogs, Stephanie lived and worked in London & Birmingham before moving to Hastings. As well as writing poetry & exploring Hastings, she is an active member of the W.I., & is kept busy with her popular on-line blog alter-ego The Hastings Battleaxe.

Sales of the book will benefit three charities: The Sara Lee Trust, Riding for the Disabled (RDA), and Queen Alexandra … More

Born OTD in 1952, Jamaican dub poet, Linton Kwesi Johnson. What is the relationship between poetry and social change? Standing at the forefront of political poetry since the 1970s, Linton Kwesi Johnson has been fighting neo-fascism, police violence and promoting socialism while putting pen to paper to refute W.H. Auden’s claim that ‘poetry makes nothing happen’. For Johnson, only the second living poet to have been published in the Penguin Modern Classics series, writing has always been ‘a political act’ and poetry ‘a cultural weapon’.

In Dread Poetry and Freedom – the first book dedicated to the work of this ‘political poet par excellence’ – … More

Born OTD in 1920, German-American poet, novelist, and short story writer, Charles Bukowski. His writing was influenced by the social, cultural, and economic ambiance of his home city of Los Angeles. A nicely produced edition bringing together the collected wisdom of the legendary Charles Bukowski, illustrated with photographs and line drawings and containing a free CD of the man himself speaking in New Orleans in 1970. Each page features Buk’s take on a variety of different aspects of modern life, including women, cats, & loneliness, with each accompanied by a mix of photographs, sketches and cool international book covers. While short, every page is golden and there’s enough quotable material in here to satiate even the most diehard Bukowski fan. Also included is an bootleg audio CD, ‘Happy Hour’, which is a live poetry reading from a New Orleans appearance in 1970.

ZIne & CD combo available in store and online £7.99.

Happy Birthday to the fantastic Salena Godden!! Springfield Road is a journey into childhood in the late 1970s, a time of halfpenny sweets, fish n chips in newspaper, scrumping apples and foraging for conkers. Set in the dawn of Thatcher’s Britain, it’s a salute to every curly-top, scabby knee’d, mixed-up, half-crazy kid with NHS glasses, free school dinners & hand-me- downs, as told by the daughter of an Irish jazz musician and a Jamaican go-go dancer. It’s about discovering that life is unfair, that there are bullies out there, and that parents die; yet it is the very antithesis of a misery memoir.

It’s a vivid, uplifting tale that seeks out the humour, colour and tenderness in the world, and when you read … More