OTD in 1917, The Balfour Declaration proclaims British support for the “establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people” with the clear understanding “that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities”

This is the controversial history of the British government’s involvement in the Zionist project, from the Balfour Declaration in 1917 … More

Born OTD in 1935, professor of literature at Columbia University, a public intellectual, & a founder of the academic field of postcolonial studies, Edward Said. For generations now, Said’s Orientalism has defined our understanding of colonialism & empire, and this Penguin edition contains a preface written by Said shortly before his death in 2003. In this highly-acclaimed work, Said surveys the history & nature of Western attitudes towards the East, considering orientalism as a powerful European ideological creation – a way for writers, philosophers & colonial administrators to deal with the ‘otherness’ of eastern culture, customs and beliefs.

He traces this view through the writings of Homer, Nerval and Flaubert, Disraeli and Kipling, whose imaginative depictions have greatly … More

OTD in 1982, from approximately 18:00 on 16 September to 08:00 on 18 September 1982, a widespread massacre was carried out by the militia under the eyes of their Israeli allies which resulted in the killing of between 460 and 3,500 civilians. Travel writer Peter Mortimer reports on Shatila, the Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon – scene of the Shatila massacre of 1982, now home to about 12,000 people living in one square kilometre. The author developed a children’s theatre group in the camp, whose members will be visiting the UK around publication.

Shatila is a Palestinian refugee camp in outer Beirut, home to 17,000 people existing in an area the size of … More

A powerful, groundbreaking history of the Occupied Territories from one of Israel’s most influential historians. From the author of the bestselling study of the 1948 War of Independence comes an incisive look at the Occupied Territories, picking up the story where The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine left off. In this comprehensive exploration of one of the world’s most prolonged & tragic conflicts, Pappe uses recently declassified archival material to analyse the motivations & strategies of the generals & politicians – & the decision-making process itself – that laid the foundation of the occupation.

From a survey of the legal and bureaucratic infrastructures that were put in place to control the population of over … More

As the First World War shatters families, destroys friendships and kills lovers, a young Palestinian dreamer sets out to find himself. Midhat Kamal navigates his way across a fractured world, from the shifting politics of the Middle East to the dinner tables of Montpellier and a newly tumultuous Paris. He discovers that everything is fragile: love turns to loss, friends become enemies and everyone is looking for a place to belong.

`A sublime reading experience: delicate, restrained, surpassingly intelligent, uncommonly poised and truly beautiful’ – Zadie Smith Isabella Hammad delicately untangles … More

When Kafka died in 1924, his loyal champion Max Brod could not bring himself to fulfil his friend’s last instruction: to burn his remaining manuscripts. Instead, Brod devoted the rest of his life to editing, publishing and canonizing Kafka’s work. By betraying his friend’s last wish, Brod twice rescued his legacy – first from physical destruction, & then from obscurity. But that betrayal was also eventually to lead to an international legal battle: as a writer in German, should Kafka’s papers come to rest in Germany, where his three sisters died as victims of the Holocaust? Or, as a Jewish writer, should his work be considered as a cultural inheritance of Israel, a state that did not exist at the time of his death?

Alongside an acutely observed portrait of Kafka, Benjamin Balint also traces the journey of the manuscripts Brod had rescued when … More

Activist, teacher, author and icon of the Black Power movement Angela Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world. In these newly collected essays, interviews and speeches, world-renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world.

Reflecting on the importance of black feminism, intersectionality and prison abolitionism for today’s struggles, Davis discusses the legacies of previous … More

Born OTD in 1953, American political scientist, activist, professor, and author, Norman Finkelstein. In an iconoclastic and controversial study, Norman Finkelstein moves from an interrogation of the place the Holocaust has come to occupy in American culture to a disturbing examination of recent Holocaust compensation agreements. It was not until the Arab-Israeli War of 1967, when Israel’s evident strength brought it into line with US foreign policy, that memory of the Holocaust began to acquire the exceptional prominence it enjoys today.

Leaders of America’s Jewish community were delighted that Israel was now deemed a major strategic asset and, Finkelstein contends, exploited … More

Born OTD in 1960, Maltese-American cartoonist & journalist, Joe Sacco. In late 91 & early 92, at the time of the first Intifada, Sacco spent two months with the Palestinians in the West Bank & Gaza Strip, travelling & taking notes. Upon returning to the United States he started writing & drawing Palestine, which combines the techniques of eyewitness reportage with the medium of comic-book storytelling to explore this complex, emotionally weighty situation.

He captures the heart of the Palestinian experience in image after unforgettable image, with great insight and remarkable humour. The … More