Born OTD in 1932, Jamaican record producer who was influential in the development of ska and reggae in the 1950s, 60s & beyond. Clement Seymour “Sir Coxsone” Dodd. In 1959 he founded a record company called World Disc. In 1962 he produced the Jazz record “I cover the waterfront” on the Port-O-Jam label, two of the musicians who played on the album, Roland Alphonso & Don Drummond became founding members of the Skatalites one year later. In 1963 he opened Studio One on Brentford Road, Kingston. It was the first black-owned recording studio in Jamaica. He held regular Sunday evening auditions in search of new talent, and it was here that Dodd auditioned Bob Marley, singing as a part of The Wailers.

“The rivalries between the sound systems, especially Prince Buster and Coxsone Dodd, was to produce many records, quite apart from … More

Available now, An anthology of conversations and essays, memories and commentary from the heyday of British pop music writing. In its heyday, from the 1960s – 1980s, the UK music press was the forging ground for a new critical culture, where readers could encounter anything from comics and cult films to new musical forms and radical underground politics. It created an off-mainstream collective cultural commons improvised through a networked subculture of rival weeklies, monthlies, & fanzines, including such titles as NME, Melody Maker, Sounds, Record Mirror, Black Echoes, Black Music, Let It Rock, Street Life, Zigzag, and Smash Hits.

This anthology of conversations and essays, memories and commentary explores how this uncharted space first came about, who put it … More