Happy Birthday Kenney Jones, born OTD in 1948. As drummer with the Small Faces, Faces and later The Who, Kenney Jones’ unique sense of rhythm was the heartbeat that powered three of the most influential rock bands of all time. Beginning in London’s post-war East End, Kenney’s story takes us through the birth of the Mod revolution, the mind-bending days of the late-60s and the raucous excesses of the ’70s and ’80s. In a career spanning six decades, Kenney was at the epicentre of many of the most exciting moments in music history and has experienced everything the industry has to offer.

He jointly created some of the world’s most-loved records, hung out with the Stones, Beatles, David Bowie, Keith Moon and … More

OUTTA SIGHT presents the first platter in a two-part series showcasing some of the rarest and hottest R&B sounds of the 21st Soul Century. The Red Edition brings together 14 killer cuts that are on every DJs hit list. These major label milestones dating from 1953 to the early sixties feature key artists in the world of R&B and Soul including Otis Redding, Big Maybelle, J J Jackson, Slim Harpo and Otis Blackwell who also provides us with the super rare Gil Bernal recording “The Dogs” from his own Bumps label.

Vinyl LP available in store and online £13.99

Mod Anthems is a gatefold, 180 gram heavyweight double LP version of “Mod Anthems,” features 28 definitive all-nighter club classics. Featuring the original label artwork of all of the 7″ singles inside, this killer collection features 60’s R&B and Northern Soul floorfillers from Mod icons such as Booker T & The MG’s, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, Doris Troy, Solomon Burke, Eddie Floyd and many more…!

Double vinyl LP available in store and online.

Coming soon, pre-order here. Go Mod! heavyweight vinyl set by Charly Records is an overview of the original Mod era. From that, you can guess that we are talking less ‘crate digging’ and more mod classics. Ok, perhaps not the obvious classics, but tunes at that end of the range. According to Charly, this is music from ‘the decade that defined the sound of Mod’, which is down as 1957 through to 1967.

Pre order vinyl double LP here.  

Known primarily as the label of soul groups the Superbs, Whispers and Entertainers IV, it has taken at least 40 years for Dore’s fluttering feather on the light blue background to reveal its full Northern Soul content. The Entertainers IV’s ‘Gettin’ Back Into Circulation’ was soon noticed, as it shared the same backing as the Whispers’ original of ‘Doctor Love’. Kenard Gardner was Lew Bedell’s right-hand soul man and his ‘Do The Skin’ also crossed the Atlantic in the 70s; the raucous dance-craze oozed soul and sported an irrepressible beat. Then came the Northern Soul behemoth – Rita & the Tiaras’ ‘Gone With The Wind Is My Love’. Released in 1967 in very small numbers, it took a decade to be discovered by the rare soul scene. It grew from a Wigan Casino floor-filler into a byword for all that is best in uptempo US soul. Plaintive vocals, atmospheric, imaginative production, a relentless beat and a melody and lyric like no other.

By the early 70s, the Fidels already had the classic stomper ‘Try A Little Harder’ under their belt, so it … More

One for the Northern Soul collectors, what a voice! Blown away by this album. “In the last two decades, Little Ann’s music has gone from being almost unheard to celebrated widely across the world. Initially known only as a footnote for having one side of one Ric-Tic single in 1968, the discovery and playing of her acetate of ‘What Should I Do’ at Wigan Casino in the late 70s meant her name become important to rare soul fans (when it was revealed that Little Ann was the real singer of the song erroneously attributed to Rose Valentine at the time).”

Once Ace Records acquired Dave Hamilton’s Detroit studio tapes, through the auspices of researcher Richard Gilbert, more previously unheard gems … More

A vinyl-only 14-track collection of the Cincinnati trio’s best Fraternity recordings. A brief appearance on Billboard magazine’s Bubbling Under chart belies the fact that the Charmaines were Cincinnati’s leading 1960s girl group. Formed by Marian “Gigi” Jackson, Dee Watkins and Irene Vinegar, the group was awarded a contract with Fraternity Records for winning a talent show in 1960. Gigi’s sister Jerri sang on many of the group’s records but was too young to perform in nightclubs. When Dee left to get married, Jerri joined as a full-time member.

By the time the Charmaines’ contract with Fraternity had run its course, the group had relocated to Canada. “We’d had … More

Maxine Brown has been popular in the black music world since 1960. ‘All In My Mind’, her hit debut, is cited as one of the first soul records but it was not until she moved to the Wand label in 1963 that her career really took off. Maxine’s golden period included her signature hit ‘Oh No, Not My Baby’ & beautiful ballads such as ‘It’s Gonna Be Alright’ & ‘Gotta Find A Way’. These are loved in the UK but it was her less familiar, uptempo Wand releases that turned her from an admired artist to a soul goddess on the Northern Soul scene. The hard-to-find ‘One In A Million’ and ‘Let Me Give You My Lovin’’ were played at rare soul dances for many years, attaining classic status on the scene, despite not selling enough to chart in the USA at the time of release.

Interestingly, when her run of solo R&B hits dried up Maxine continued to reach the pop charts with ‘One Step … More

Sixties Mod band The Action only released six singles in their lifetime – or seven, if you count a pre-Action single by The Boys – but their legend has grown exponentially since their demise in 1968. The Action was the first band signed by Beatles producer George Martin after he left EMI to set up his own company Air Productions. In due course, he produced the band’s five singles issued on Parlophone between 1965 and 1967 as well as tracks intended for a never-released album.

The New Action imagines what the band’s album – which was announced at the time in the press – might … More

From its opening in 1963 until its final emotive all-nighter, starring US soul legend Edwin Starr in January 1971, the Twisted Wheel played host to almost every major British R&B act & the very best that the USA had to offer. Steeped in black American music it is no surprise that it became the crucible of NORTHERN SOUL setting the template for all-night gatherings across the north of England. Pictured to the left of our cover – sporting his trademark turban – is Screaming Jay Hawkins arriving at London airport with his wife Ginny for his debut visit to the UK on 26th January, 1965. There to meet & greet Hawkins was resident Twisted Wheel DJ Roger Eagle, a huge fan of the charismatic performer. Hawkins’ million-selling, “I Put A Spell On You”, had been recorded almost a decade earlier and released on the iconic Chicago based OKeh Records, a label very much on Eagle’s radar for its slue of cult Blues & R&B artists.

Vinyl LP available in store and online.