A passionate and personal book about the writer’s own love for a controversial architectural style. Whether you love or hate brutalist buildings, this book will explain what it is about them that elicits such strong feeling. You will understand the true power of concrete and of mammoth-sized buildings, but also some of the more subtle aspects of brutalist buildings that you may not have known or considered.

Brutalist architecture, which flourished in the 1950s to mid-1970s, gained its name from the term ‘ Beton-brut’, or raw concrete … More

What does it mean to be out walking in the world, whether in a landscape or a metropolis, on a pilgrimage or a protest march? In this first general history of walking, Solnit draws together many histories to create a range of possibilities for this most basic act. Arguing that walking as history means walking for pleasure and for political, aesthetic, and social meaning, Solnit homes in on the walkers whose everyday & extreme acts have shaped our culture, from the peripatetic philosophers of ancient Greece to the poets of the Romantic Age, from the perambulations of the Surrealists to the ascents of mountaineers.

With profiles of some of the most significant walkers in history and fiction – from Wordsworth to Gary Snyder, from … More

We live in a world that prizes the fast over the slow, the new over the familiar and work over rest. Birds Art Life Death is Kyo Maclear’s beautiful journey to stake out a sense of meaning amid the crushing rush. One winter Maclear felt unmoored. Her father had recently fallen ill and she suddenly found herself a little lost. In the midst of this crisis, she met a musician who loved birds. When he watched birds and began to photograph them, his worries dissipated.

Curious, she began to accompany him on his urban birdwatching expeditions and witnessed the magic of a transient city. Birds … More

The oak is the wooden tie between heaven and earth. It is the lynch pin of the British landscape. The oak is our most beloved and most common tree. It has roots that stretch back to all the old European cultures but Britain has more ancient oaks than all the other European countries put together.

More than half the ancient oaks in the world are in Britain. Many of our ancestors – the Angles, the … More

New release from Iain Sinclair, in store tomorrow. “We shape ourselves, & are shaped in return, by the walls that contain us. Buildings affect how we sleep, work, socialise & even breathe. They can isolate & endanger us but they can also heal us. We project our hopes & fears onto buildings, while they absorb our histories. In Living With Buildings, Iain Sinclair embarks on a series of expeditions – through London, Marseille, Mexico & the Outer Hebrides.”

He explores the relationship between sickness and structure, and between art, architecture, social planning and health, taking plenty of detours … More

Not so long ago, our roads, buildings, gravestones and monuments were built from local rock, our cities were powered by coal from Welsh mines, and our lamps were lit with paraffin from Scottish shale. At the height of the empire, British stone travelled across the world to India and China, Sri Lanka and Argentina, Singapore and South Africa.

There were thousands of mines, quarries, slag heaps and brick pits across the British Isles. We live among the remnants … More

The city stretched beneath his arms was a cluster of skyscrapers & factories, pylons, gasworks & clocktowers, its coastline fraught with crested waves, its hills rising through the urban sprawl like naked limbs. A closer look found the monster-humps of the Forth Bridge bounding over black, nameless water; what was surely the paddle steamer Waverley chugged a narrower channel further south. And there, no mistake, were Glasgow Cathedral & the Necropolis overlooking Dennistoun.

At the foot, sitting on the rim of the picture frame and almost missable, was a tiny man with glasses; … More