When Kafka died in 1924, his loyal champion Max Brod could not bring himself to fulfil his friend’s last instruction: to burn his remaining manuscripts. Instead, Brod devoted the rest of his life to editing, publishing and canonizing Kafka’s work. By betraying his friend’s last wish, Brod twice rescued his legacy – first from physical destruction, & then from obscurity. But that betrayal was also eventually to lead to an international legal battle: as a writer in German, should Kafka’s papers come to rest in Germany, where his three sisters died as victims of the Holocaust? Or, as a Jewish writer, should his work be considered as a cultural inheritance of Israel, a state that did not exist at the time of his death?

Alongside an acutely observed portrait of Kafka, Benjamin Balint also traces the journey of the manuscripts Brod had rescued when … More

Next book reading at Printed Matter will be by local author, artist & playwright, Howard Colyer. Joseph K is not a happy man. Not only has he been arrested on the morning of his thirtieth birthday for no discernible reason, he’s not had his breakfast yet. Both problems weigh heavily on Joseph’s mind as he reflects on the incidents that may- or may not- have led him to his incarceration and possible imminent execution.

Written by Prague’s favourite son on the eve of the first world war there are echoes of impending doom throughout … More