Federal Records is generally considered to be responsible for birthing Rocksteady in the 1960’s, but Jamaica’s first recording studio also had a nice little side-thing going for jazz records at the same time. New Dub Store compilation Jamaica Jazz from Federal Records: Carib Roots, Jazz, Mento, Latin, Merengue & Rhumba 1960-1968 collates some crucial cuts from the period. Features Ernest Ranglin, Count Owen & His Calypsonians, Cecil Lloyd and many more.

2 x vinyl LP available in store and online.

The Hammond organ was first manufactured in 1935. In 1954, the now famous Hammond B3 model was introduced with additional harmonic percussion feature. When the company went out of business in 1985, around two million of various models of the Hammond organ have been produced. The Hammond B3 was originally marketed to churches as a lower-cost alternative to the wind-driven pipe organ. It quickly became popular with professional jazz musicians in organ trios. Jimmy Smith’s use of the Hammond B3 inspired a generation of organ players, and its use became more widespread in the 1960s and 1970s in rhythm and blues, rock, reggae, and progressive rock.

This collection is centered on the exciting and dynamic sounds of the Hammond B3 organ! Coming soon, pre-order here.

Bass player extraordinaire Charles Mingus, who died in 1979, is one of the essential composers in the history of jazz, and Beneath the Underdog, his celebrated, wild, funny, demonic, anguished, shocking and profoundly moving memoir, is the greatest autobiography ever written by a jazz musician. It tells of his God-haunted childhood in Watts during the 1920s and 1930s; his outcast adolescent years; his apprenticeship, not only with jazzmen but also with pimps, hookers, junkies, and hoodlums; and his golden years in New York City with such legendary figures as Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton, Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie.

  Here is Mingus in his own words, from shabby roadhouses to fabulous estates, from the psychiatric wards of Bellevue … More

Born OTD in 1917, British historian of the rise of industrial capitalism, socialism & nationalism, Eric Hobsbawm. This collection of 26 essays range over the history of working men & women between the late 18th century & the present day, and brings back into print a selection of this celebrated historian’s pioneering studies into labour history, together with more recent reflections previously unpublished in book form. Hobsbawm’s penetrating essays on labour history & social protest opened up a new field of study & set standards of wide-ranging, evocative, incisive analysis.

Essays in this collection include the formation of the British working class; labour custom and traditions; the political radicalism of … More

Following on from Giant Steps, comes the second instalment in Kenny Mathieson’s series of jazz histories. Cookin’ examines the birth and development of two of the key jazz styles of the post-war era, hard bop and its related offshoot, soul jazz. Hard bop was the most exciting jazz style of its day, and remains at the core of the modern jazz mainstream even now.

It drew on the twin poles of bebop and the blues for its foundation, spiced up with gospel, Latin and … More

When all else fails, when our compass is broken, there is one thing some of us have come to rely on: music really can give us a sense of something like home. With It Gets Me Home, This Curving Track, legendary music critic Ian Penman reaches for a vanished moment in musical history when cultures collided and a certain kind of cross-generational and `cross-colour’ awareness was born. His cast of characters includes the Mods, James Brown, Charlie Parker, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, John Fahey, Steely Dan and Prince – black artists who were innovators, and white musicians who copied them for the mainstream.

In `prose that glides and shimmies and pivots on risky metaphors, low puns and highbrow reference points’ (Brian Dillon, Frieze), … More

Born OTD in 1915, American jazz singer with a career spanning nearly thirty years, Eleanora Fagan AKA, Billie Holiday. Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz music & pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. She was known for her vocal delivery and improvisational skills

Billie Holiday, by Argentinian Carlos Sampayo and artist José Muñoz is a graphic memoir in the NBM Graphic biography series … More

Born OTD in 1949, American soul, jazz poet, musician, and author, known primarily for his work as a spoken-word performer, Gil Scott-Heron. Author Leslie Gordon Goffe takes a look at the up and down life of American singer Gil Scott-Heron, the so-called ‘Godfather of Rap’. This book also takes a look at Gil’s relatioship with his father, Jamaican footballer, Gillie Heron. The first black person to play professional football in the US as well as Scotland’s Celtic Football Club.

Available in store and online.