A splash of something huge resounds through the sea-fog. In the stillness of a dark room, some unspeakable evil is making its approach. This new selection offers the most chilling and unsettling of Hodgson’s short fiction, from encounters with abominations at sea to fireside tales of otherworldly forces from his inventive `occult detective’ character Carnacki, the ghost finder.

A master of conjuring atmosphere, when the horror inevitably arrives it is delivered with breathtaking pace and the author’s unique … More

A young girl whose love for her fiance continues even after her death; a sinister old lady with claw-like hands who cares little for the qualities of her companions provided they are young and full of life; and a haunted mirror that foretells of approaching death for those who gaze into its depths. These are just some of the haunting tales gathered together in this macabre collection of short stories. Reissued in the Tales of the Weird series and introduced by British Library curator Greg Buzwell, The Face in the Glass is the first selection of Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s supernatural short stories to be widely available in more than 100 years.

Available in store and online.

Evil Roots: Killer Tales of the Botanical Gothic. Strangling vines and meat-hungry flora fill this unruly garden of strange stories, selected for their significance as the seeds of the villainous (or perhaps just misunderstood) `killer plant’ in fiction, film and video games. Step within to marvel at Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s giant wistaria and H. G. Wells’ hungry orchid; hear the calls of the ethereal women of the wood, and the frightful drone of the moaning lily; and do tread carefully around E. Nesbit’s wandering creepers…

Every strain of vegetable threat (and one deadly fungus) can be found within this new collection, representing the very best … More

From the imaginations of Gothic short-story writers such as Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mary Shelley and H.P. Lovecraft came one of the most complex of villains – the mad scientist. Promethean Horrors presents some of the greatest mad scientists ever created, as each cautionary tale explores the consequences of pushing nature too far. These savants take many forms: there are malcontents who strive to create poisonous humans; technologists obsessed with genetic splicing; mesmerists interested in the way consciousness operates after death and inventors who believe in a hidden reality. United by an unhealthy obsession with wanting to reach beyond their circumstances, these mad scientists are marked by their magical capacity to alter the present, a gift that always comes at a price. .

Available in store and online.

When it was first published in 1897 – 120 years ago – Irish author Bram Stoker’s Dracula was ranked above work by Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, as well as Wuthering Heights. Yet it never made Stoker any money. Since 1931’s film Nosferatu the Vampire, however, it has never been out of print and is legendary among fans of the dark, macabre and mysterious …

Critic John Sutherland, a Dracula fan since childhood – and author of the literary puzzle classics Is Heathcliff a Murderer? … More

The story is set in 1790 in the countryside around the Dutch settlement of Tarry Town, in a secluded glen called Sleepy Hollow. Sleepy Hollow is renowned for its ghosts & the haunting atmosphere that pervades the imaginations of its inhabitants & visitors. Some residents say this town was bewitched during the early days of the Dutch settlement. Other residents say an old Native American chief, the wizard of his tribe, held his powwows here before the country was discovered by Master Hendrick Hudson.

The most infamous spectre in the Hollow is the Headless Horseman, said to be the ghost of a Hessian trooper … More

“I realised I was leading a double life…” Robert Louis Stevenson liked to tell the story of how The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) came to him one night in a dream, while staying, for the sake of his health, in the provincial English seaside town of Bournemouth. He wrote the first draft in three days – then burned it when his wife suggested some changes. The second version was finished by the end of the week, and has scarcely been out of print since.

The ‘double life’ that the book’s hero (the respectable doctor Henry Jekyll) finds himself leading was something that Stevenson himself … More