Born OTD in 1939, Australian journalist & documentary filmmaker, John Pilger. Pilger is a strong critic of American, Australian and British foreign policy, which he considers to be driven by an imperialist agenda. Pilger has also criticised his native country’s treatment of Indigenous Australians.

Tell Me No Lies is a celebration of the very best investigative journalism, and includes writing by some of the … More

A blistering character study & an examination of the American melting pot & the judicial system that keeps it in check, Twelve Angry Men holds at its core a deeply patriotic faith in the U.S. legal system. The play centers on Juror Eight, who is at first the sole holdout in an 11-1 guilty vote. Eight sets his sights not on proving the other jurors wrong but rather on getting them to look at the situation in a clear-eyed way not affected by their personal prejudices or biases.

Reginald Rose deliberately and carefully peels away the layers of artifice from the men and allows a fuller picture to … More

Born OTD in 1977, Nigerian novelist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. “At the gates, Biafran soldiers were waving cars through. They looked distinguished in their khaki uniforms, boots shining, half of a yellow sun sewn on their sleeves.” This story tracks a family as they transition from a position of influence and privilege with large, comfortable homes in Nigeria, to become citizens of the newly formed republic of Biafra.

In 1960s Nigeria, Ugwu, a boy from a poor village, goes to work for Odenigbo, a radical university professor. Soon … More

Born OTD in 1942, Bernard MacLaverty. Set in Northern Ireland, it tells the story of Cal, a young, unemployed Catholic man living on a Protestant housing estate at the height of The Troubles. Each night he waits to be fire-bombed out of the home he shares with his father and each morning he gets up to find everything is okay.

But there’s a dark, pervasive atmosphere, one that seem only conducive to fear and violence, and for much of this … More

When Ronit’s father dies she is called back into the very different world of her childhood, a world she thought she had left far behind. The orthodox Jewish suburb of Hendon, is outraged by Ronit & her provocative ways. But Ronit is shocked too by the confrontation with her past. And when she meets up with her childhood girlfriend Esti, she is forced to think again about what she has left behind.

The rabbi’s nephew and likely successor, Dovid, calls his cousin Ronit in New York to tell her that her father … More

Slavoj Zizek, dubbed by the Village Voice “the giant of Ljubljana,” is back with a new edition of his seriously entertaining book on film, psychoanalysis (and life). His inimitable blend of philosophical and social theory, Lacanian analysis, and outrageous humor are made to show how Hollywood movies can explain psychoanalysis-and vice versa using films such as Marnie and The Man Who Knew Too Much.

The title is just the first of many startling asides, observations and insights that fill this guide to Hollywood on … More

Focusing upon the production of post-punk art, film, music, & publishing, this book offers new perspectives on an overlooked period of cultural activity, & probes the lessons that might be learnt from history for artists & musicians working under 21st century conditions of austerity.

Full list of contributors: Gavin Butt, Sue Clayton, Kodwo Eshun, Mark Fisher, Green Gartside, Dominic Johnson, Lydia Lunch, Eliete Mejorado, … More