For the next PM Book Club, we’ll be discussing Naomi Klein’s, ‘No Is Not Enough’. “..That around the world, shock political tactics are being used to generate crisis after crisis, designed to force through policies that will destroy people, the environment, the economy and our security. That extremism isn’t a freak event – it’s a toxic cocktail of our times. From how to trash the Trump megabrand to the art of reclaiming the populist argument, Naomi Klein shows all of us how we can break the spell and win the world we need.”

Book Club will meet on Tuesday, 25th June, 6pm in the shop.New members welcome. 10% discount on all attendees of … More

In looking at the forces that brought our current administration to power one thing is clear: much of the population believes that our economic system is rigged to enrich the privileged elites at the expense of hard-working Americans. This is a belief held equally on both sides of political spectrum, & it seems only to be gaining momentum. A key reason, says Financial Times columnist Rana Foroohar, is the fact that Wall Street is no longer supporting Main Street businesses that create the jobs for the middle and working class.

She draws on in-depth reporting and interviews at the highest rungs of business and government to show how the “financialization … More

Born OTD in 1820, Friedrich Engels. Much of what Marx and Engels’ proposed – a state education system, a progressive income tax, the nationalisation of banks – would continue to be at the heart of political debate into the 21st century. It is no surprise, perhaps, that The Communist Manifesto (as it was later renamed) is the second best-selling book of all time, surpassed only by The Bible.

The Guardian’s editorial cartoonist Martin Rowson employs his trademark draughtsmanship and wit to this lively graphic novel adaptation of Marx … More

Born OTD in 1859, American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform, John Dewey. More than six decades after John Dewey’s death, his political philosophy is undergoing a revival. With renewed interest in pragmatism and its implications for democracy in an age of mass communication, bureaucracy, and ever-increasing social complexities.

Dewey’s The Public and Its Problems, first published in 1927, remains vital to any discussion of today’s political issues. This … More

Global finance is a system that works for the few and against the many. We need finance – but when finance grows too big it becomes a curse. The City of London is the single biggest drain on our resources; it sucks talent out of every sphere, it siphons wealth and hoovers up government time. Yet to be `competitive’, we’re told we must turn a blind eye to money-laundering and appease big business with tax cuts. We are told global finance is about wealth creation; the reality is wealth extraction.

Tracing the curse back through economic history, Shaxson uncovers how we got to this point. He exposes offshore tax havens; … More

Born OTD in 1810, English novelist, biographer, and short story writer, Elizabeth Gaskell. Set in Manchester in the 1840s – a period of industrial unrest and extreme deprivation – Mary Barton depicts the effects of economic and physical hardship upon the city’s working-class community.

Paralleling the novel’s treatment of the relationship between masters and men, the suffering of the poor, and the workmen’s angry … More

The turbulence of the financial markets is often explained in terms of the immorality of market agents, misguided economic theory or unsuitable regulation. Even when these explanations are not false ones, they leave aside the main problem: the nature of financial value. Starting out from the concept of fictitious capital, Cedric Durand argues that finance pre-empts future production, appropriating for itself wealth that is yet to be created.

  Using comparative data covering the last four decades, he shows that the rise in private and public debt, the … More