Coming soon, pre-order here. The leading thinker & most visible public advocate of modern monetary theory – the freshest & most important idea about economics in decades – delivers a radically different, bold, new understanding for how to build a just & prosperous society. Any ambitious proposal – ranging from fixing crumbling infrastructure to Medicare for all or preventing the coming climate apocalypse – inevitably sparks questions: how can we afford it? How can we pay for it? Stephanie Kelton points out how misguided those questions really are by using the bold ideas of modern monetary theory (MMT), a fundamentally different approach to using our resources to maximize our potential as a society. We’ve been thinking about government spending in the wrong ways, Kelton argues, on both sides of the political aisle.

Everything that both liberal/progressives and conservatives believe about deficits and the role of money and government spending in the economy … More

Born OTD in 1928, American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, historian, social critic, and political activist, Noam Chomsky. Profit Over People is one of the key texts explaining how the crisis facing us operates & how, through Chomsky’s analysis of resistance, we may find an escape from the closing net. Why is the Atlantic slowly filling with crude petroleum, threatening a millions-of-years-old ecological balance? Why did traders at prominent banks take high-risk gambles with the money entrusted to them by hundreds of thousands of clients around the world, expanding & leveraging their investments to the point that failure led to a global financial crisis that left millions of people jobless & hundreds of cities economically devastated?

Why would the worlds most powerful military spend ten years fighting an enemy that presents no direct threat to secure … More

What happens if a radical government gets elected in Britain? How will the banks, the civil servants, the media and the military react? Is the idea of a British coup far-fetched? How can the left prepare? Chris Nineham addresses these questions by looking behind the myths at the reality of two hundred years of British state rule. He brings us a warning from history. Don’t be fooled again, read this book.

The first attempt since the 1980s to analyse the British state’s capacity to block change and derail social movements. A … More

From a text message to a war, from a Valentine’s rose to a flight or even having a child, How Bad are Bananas? gives us the carbon answers we need and provides plenty of revelations. By talking through a hundred or so items, Mike Berners-Lee sets out to give us a carbon instinct for the footprint of literally anything we do, buy and think about. He helps us pick our battles by laying out the orders of magnitude.

The book ranges from the everyday (foods, books, plastic bags, bikes, flights, baths…) and the global (deforestation, data centres, rice … More

Out now in paperback. We need finance – but when finance grows too big it becomes a curse. The City of London is the single biggest drain on our resources, sucking talent out of every sphere, siphoning wealth and hoovering up government time. Yet to be ‘competitive’, we’re told we must turn a blind eye to money laundering and appease big business with tax cuts. Tracing the curse back through economic history, Nicholas Shaxson uncovers how we got to this point. Moving from offshore tax havens to the bizarre industry of wealth management, he tells the explosive story of how finance established a stranglehold on society – and reveals how we can begin to break free.

This is a book that none of us can afford to ignore – an agenda-setting, campaigning investigation that shows how … More

Born OTD in 1908, Canadian-born economist, public official, and diplomat, John Kenneth Galbraith. Galbraith’s international bestseller The Affluent Society is a witty, graceful and devastating attack on some of our most cherished economic myths. As relevant today as when it was first published over 60 years ago, this newly updated edition of Galbraith’s classic text on the ‘economics of abundance’, lays bare the hazards of individual and social complacency about economic inequality. Why worship work and productivity if many of the goods we produce are superfluous – artificial ‘needs’ created by high-pressure advertising? Why begrudge expenditure on vital public works while ignoring waste and extravagance in the private sector of the economy? Classical economics was born in a harsh world of mass poverty, and has left us with a set of preconceptions ill-adapted to the realities of our own richer age.

And so, too often, ‘the bland lead the bland’. Our unfamiliar problems need a new approach, and the reception given … More

Set against the backdrop of disastrous flooding in the North of England, ‘Rain’ dramatically chronicles the developing relationship between two young women, one of whom is a committed environmental campaigner. Their wild Bronte moorland is being criminally mismanaged. Birds and animals are being slaughtered. Across the country, crops are being systematically poisoned, even the soil itself. Rain centres on one relatively small example of moorland ownership by an elite group that impacts catastrophically on the unlanded majority living in the valley below. But the campaigners know that `a million other valleys need saving’.

They need saving not just for the sake of their human inhabitants, but for the insects and plants, birds and … More

Book launch tomorrow of ‘Stolen’ with Grace Blakeley at St Mary in the Castle. 6pm. “Stolen tells the story of how and why this financialization occurred, what it means for our society and politics, and what the left can do to fight it. At present, the odds are stacked against labour and in favour of finance capital. But what follows it will be determined by which group — the many or the few — manages to take power in this moment of crisis. How we understand this moment, and what we do with it, will determine the course of the future.”

Available in store and online.

We are losing the commons. Austerity and neoliberal policies have depleted our shared wealth; our national utilities have been sold off to foreign conglomerates, social housing is almost non-existent, our parks are cordoned off for private events and our national art galleries are sponsored by banks and oil companies. This plunder deprives us all of our common rights, recognized as far back as the Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest of 1217, to share fairly and equitably in our public wealth.

Guy Standing leads us through a new appraisal of the commons, stemming from the medieval concept of common land reserved … More

In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, central banks created trillions of dollars of new money, and poured it into financial markets. ‘Quantitative Easing’ (QE) was supposed to prevent deflation and restore economic growth. But the money didn’t go to ordinary people: it went to the rich, who didn’t need it. It went to big corporations and banks – the same banks whose reckless lending caused the crash. This led to a decade of stagnation, not recovery. QE failed.

In this book, Frances Coppola makes the case for a ‘people’s QE’, in which the money goes directly to ordinary … More