Rave, a ’98 novel by German author Rainald Goetz & has been translated by Adrian Nathan West. Rave was the first of five stories in Goetz’s ‘This Morning’ series, which focussed on popular culture of the ‘90s. An examination & celebration of the budding German techno scene, the novel was written with collaborative guidance from the likes of Sven Väth & DJ Westbam. “In RAVE, [Goetz] dives fully into dissolution,..” “Celebrating what is neither counter-culture nor`mass culture’ in Adorno’s disparaging sense, but a new way of experiencing mental processes & intimacy.”

‘To sample an old saying: if you can remember the nineties, you weren’t there. Rainald Goetz was there, and found … More

Born OTD in 1922, American novelist and poet, Jack Kerouac. Kerouac is recognized for his method of spontaneous prose. Thematically, his work covers topics such as Catholic spirituality, jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel. “A young innocent, joins his hero Dean Moriarty, a traveller and mystic, the living epitome of Beat, on a breathless, exuberant ride back and forth across the United States. Their hedonistic search for release or fulfilment through drink, sex, drugs and jazz becomes an exploration of personal freedom, a test of the limits of the American dream..”

A brilliant blend of fiction and autobiography, Jack Kerouac’s exhilarating novel swings to the rhythms of 1950s underground America, racing … More

Born OTD in 1914, primary figure of the Beat Generation & a major postmodernist author whose influence is considered to have affected a range of popular culture as well as literature, William S. Burroughs. In 1943, while living in New York City, he befriended Allen Ginsberg & Jack Kerouac, and out of their mutual influence grew the foundation of the Beat Generation, which was later a defining influence on the 1960s counterculture.

This surreal fable, set in America’s Old West, features a cast of notorious characters: The Crying Gun, who breaks into … More

Mod has its roots in in London with a group of young men in the late Fifties who were known as modernists because they listened to modern jazz. A Pocket Guide to Mod covers fashion including the use of the Union Flag and RAF roundel; music including bands such as The Who, Small Faces and Yardbirds who were associated with the music and locations such as The Eel Pie Island Hotel at Twickenham near London; amphetamines, the mod drug of choice that fuelled marathon all-night dancing; and scooters including Vespas and Lambrettas often highly customised.

Available in store and online.

Out of print for 50 years, Jeff Nuttall’s Bomb Culture has achieved legendary status as a powerful, informative, & spirited exploration of 1960s alternative society & counterculture. Nuttall’s confessional account of the period investigates the sources of its radical art, music, & protest movements as well as the beliefs, anxieties, & conceits of its key agitators, including his own.

Nuttall argued that a tangible psychic dread of nuclear holocaust pervaded both high and low cultures, determining their attitude and … More

Available now, An anthology of conversations and essays, memories and commentary from the heyday of British pop music writing. In its heyday, from the 1960s – 1980s, the UK music press was the forging ground for a new critical culture, where readers could encounter anything from comics and cult films to new musical forms and radical underground politics. It created an off-mainstream collective cultural commons improvised through a networked subculture of rival weeklies, monthlies, & fanzines, including such titles as NME, Melody Maker, Sounds, Record Mirror, Black Echoes, Black Music, Let It Rock, Street Life, Zigzag, and Smash Hits.

This anthology of conversations and essays, memories and commentary explores how this uncharted space first came about, who put it … More