It’s a belief that unites the left and right, psychologists and philosophers, writers and historians. It drives the headlines that surround us and the laws that touch our lives. From Machiavelli to Hobbes, Freud to Dawkins, the roots of this belief have sunk deep into Western thought. Human beings, we’re taught, are by nature selfish and governed by self-interest. Humankind makes a new argument: that it is realistic, as well as revolutionary, to assume that people are good. The instinct to cooperate rather than compete, trust rather than distrust, has an evolutionary basis going right back to the beginning of Homo sapiens. By thinking the worst of others, we bring out the worst in our politics and economics too.

In this major book, international-bestselling author Rutger Bregman takes some of the world’s most famous studies and events and reframes … More

Economics is broken, and the planet is paying the price. Unforeseen financial crises. Extreme wealth inequality. Relentless pressure on the environment. Can we go on like this? Is there an alternative? In Doughnut Economics, Kate Raworth lays out the seven deadly mistakes of economics and offers a radical re-envisioning of the system that has brought us to the point of ruin. Moving beyond the myths of `rational economic man’ and unlimited growth, Doughnut Economics zeroes in on the sweet spot: a system that meets all our needs without exhausting the planet.

The demands of the 21st century require a new shape of economics. This might just be it. Available online.

In 1995, in the first contested election in the history of the AFL-CIO, John Sweeney won the presidency of the nation’s largest labor federation, promising renewal and resurgence. Today, less than 7 percent of American private-sector workers belong to a union, the lowest percentage since the beginning of the 20th century, and public employee collective bargaining has been dealt devastating blows in Wisconsin & elsewhere. What happened? Jane McAlevey is famous – and notorious – in the American labor movement as the hard-charging organizer who racked up a string of victories at a time when union leaders said winning wasn’t possible.

Then she was bounced from the movement, a victim of the high-level internecine warfare that has torn apart organized labor. … More

Since the 1950s we have lost 63 per cent of our orchards through development or neglect, and even though we have been able to grow 3,000 varieties of apple in England, almost 70 per cent of apples we buy are imported. Common Ground has worked to interest local communities in creating and saving orchards to provide fruit and nuts, havens for wildlife and places of beauty.

The Community Orchards Handbook shows how to start your own Community Orchard, from getting support to tackling legal issues, organising … More

“..I was distracted from the frontline, though, by appearance on Top of the Pops one Thursday night of a new group. The sampled Prince Buster screech at the start of the song… Now, Saturday mornings were spent exploring every possible way of exchanging my pocket money for 2-Tone and 2-Tone related products.”

Know Your Place Is a collection of essays about the working class, written by the working class. We had an … More

The Another Dinner is Possible: More Than Just a Vegan Cookbook by Isy Morgenmuffel & Mike Home Brew is back in stock. Mike and Isy are cooks with Brighton’s Anarchist Teapot mobile kitchen, a volunteer collective that cooks for activist and community gatherings and mobilisations across the UK and Europe.

Another Dinner Is Possible is not your average vegan cookbook—It’s a guide to developing a healthier relationship with the food … More

Community gardening is a growing revolution that is taking root in towns and cities all over the world. Groups of likeminded people are transforming neglected plots of land into green, flourishing spaces for everyone to enjoy. In The Community Gardening Handbook, Ben Raskin shares his keen expertise in an invaluable introduction to a new wave of collective self- sufficiency, encouraging a community audience to grow food and to garden together.

A look into the background of community gardening and its benefits is followed by a practical guide: planning advice is … More

First published OTD in 1851, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. Moby Dick is the story of Captain Ahab’s quest to avenge the whale that `reaped’ his leg. The quest is an obsession and the novel is a diabolical study of how a man becomes a fanatic. But it is also a hymn to democracy. Bent as the crew is on Ahab’s appalling crusade, it is equally the image of a co-operative community at work: all hands dependent on all hands, each individual responsible for the security of each. Among the crew is Ishmael, the novel’s narrator, ordinary sailor, and extraordinary reader.

Digressive, allusive, vulgar, transcendent, the story Ishmael tells is above all an education:in the practice of whaling, in the art … More

All you ever wanted to know about setting up a Housing Co-op – from the nitty gritty of the legal stuff and buying a place through to the first-hand experience of actually living in a co-operatively owned house. Fundraising, accounts, tenancy law and a useful list of further information sources from the good people at Radical Routes who aim to share their many collective years of knowledge and experience.

Why pay rent into a landlord’s pocket when you can create a permanent, secure housing controlled by the tenants?… 2015 … More