Born OTD in 1883, economist John Maynard Keynes. A groundbreaking debunking of moderate attempts to resolve financial crises In the ruins of the 2007-2008 financial crisis, self-proclaimed progressives the world over clamored to resurrect the economic theory of John Maynard Keynes. The crisis seemed to expose the disaster of small-state, free-market liberalization and deregulation. Keynesian political economy, in contrast, could put the state back at the heart of the economy and arm it with the knowledge needed to rescue us.

But what it was supposed to rescue us from was not so clear. Was it the end of capitalism or … More

Born OTD in 1970, Canadian author, social activist, and filmmaker known for her political analyses and criticism of corporate globalization and of capitalism, Naomi Klein. Klein – award-winning journalist, bestselling author of No Logo, The Shock Doctrine & This Changes Everything, scourge of brand bullies and corporate liars – gives us the toolkit we need to survive our surreal, shocking age. ‘This is a look at how we arrived at this surreal political moment, how to keep it from getting a lot worse, and how, if we keep our heads, we can flip the script.’

No Is Not Enough reveals, among other things, that the disorientation we’re feeling is deliberate. That around the world, shock … More

Born OTD in 1818, German philosopher, economist, historian, sociologist, political theorist, journalist and socialist revolutionary, Karl Marx. Marx’s Das Kapital cannot be put into a box marked ‘economics’. It is a work of politics, history, economics, philosophy and even in places, literature. This illustrated introduction to the Marxist critique of capitalist production and its consequences for a whole range of social activities such as politics, media, education and religion.

  Das Kapital is not a critique of a particular capitalist system in a particular country at a particular time. … More

Where Does Money Come From? reveals how, contrary to public perception, the bulk of today’s money supply is created and allocated by commercial banks in their role as providers of credit. The authors argue that this system is inherently unstable, with little effective regulation of how much credit is provided, or whether it is used for productive or speculative purposes.

Based on detailed research and consultation with experts, including from the Bank of England, Where Does Money Come From? reviews … More

Examining a series of El Nino-induced droughts & the famines that they spawned around the globe in the last third of the 19th century, Mike Davis discloses the intimate, baleful relationship between imperial arrogance & natural incident that combined to produce some of the worst tragedies in human history. Late Victorian Holocausts focuses on three zones of drought & subsequent famine: India, Northern China; & North eastern Brazil. All were affected by the same global climatic factors that caused massive crop failures, & all experienced brutal famines that decimated local populations.

But the effects of drought were magnified in each case because of singularly destructive policies promulgated by different ruling elites. … More

In this original and provocative book Ellen Meiksins Wood reminds us that capitalism is not a natural and inevitable consequence of human nature, nor is it simply an extension of age-old practices of trade and commerce. Rather, it is a late and localized product of very specific historical conditions, which required great transformations in social relations and in the human interaction with nature. This new edition is substantially revised and expanded, with extensive new material on imperialism, anti-Eurocentric history, capitalism and the nation-state, and the differences between capitalism and non-capitalist commerce.

The author traces links between the origin of capitalism and contemporary conditions such as ‘globalization’, ecological degradation, and the current … More

Unaffordable housing, poverty wages, healthcare, climate change, border policing; not the issues you ordinarily hear feminists talking about. But don’t these issues impact the vast majority of women globally? Taking as its inspiration the new wave of feminist militancy that has erupted globally, this Manifesto makes a simple but powerful case: Feminism shouldn’t start – or stop – with seeing women represented at the top of society. It must start with those at the bottom, and fight for the world they deserve.

And that means targeting capitalism. Feminism must be anti-capitalist, eco-socialist and anti-racist. This is a manifesto for the 99%. New … More

Blending memoir with critique, an award-winning poet and essayist’s devastating exploration of sickness and health, cancer and the cancer industry, in the modern world. A week after her 41st birthday, Anne Boyer was diagnosed with highly aggressive triple-negative breast cancer. For a single mother living payslip to payslip, the condition was both a crisis and an initiation into new ideas about mortality and the gendered politics of illness. In The Undying – at once her harrowing memoir of survival, and a 21st-century Illness as Metaphor – Boyer draws on sources from ancient Roman dream diarists to cancer vloggers to explore the experience of illness.

She investigates the quackeries, casualties and ecological costs of cancer under capitalism, and dives into the long line of women … More

Rosa Luxemburg’s writings reveal one of the most brilliant and passionate minds drawn to the revolutionary socialist movement. Through the letters, pamphlets and theorising, we see an outstanding social and economic theorist, a dedicated political activist and a devoted confidant. Providing an extensive overview of her writings, this volume contains a number of items never before anthologised.

Her work was broad in scope tackling capitalism and socialism; globalisation and imperialism; history; war and peace; social struggles, trade … More

‘Now We Have Your Attention’ makes sense of what is happening in British politics by taking a radically different perspective: the people’s. From a warehouse in Manchester to a pub in Essex, from the outskirts of Glasgow to a racecourse in Durham, Jack Shenker uncovers the root causes of our current crisis and the future direction of British politics through the lives of ordinary individuals. Taking us deep into communities hollowed out by austerity and decades of economic disadvantage, among a generation crippled by precarious work and unaffordable housing, he shows where the chaos at Westminster ultimately springs from – and how disillusionment with it is fuelling a passionate engagement with politics of a completely different kind: local, personal, effective and utterly fearless.

Joining a `McStrike’ protest on a roundabout in Cambridge and a gathering of the London Renters’ Union in the aftermath … More