While Montego Bay natives Jackie Bernard, his brother Footy Bernard and cousin Lloyd Kerr recorded under various guises in the early ’60s, their collective arrival as The Kingstonians in 1967 marked a sea change not only in the vocal trio’s productivity and popularity, but also in the emerging Reggae sound. The Kingstonians made several chart-topping singles between 1968 and 1970, including the massive hit “Singer Man” whose success ultimately led to the release of their sole LP, Sufferer.

Originally issued on Trojan, Sufferer collects a dozen of The Kingstonians’ best-known songs. Produced by Derrick Harriott, these truly boss … More

Born OTD in 1940, Jamaican musical artist popular in the 1960s and 1970s, Derrick Morgan. In 1959, Morgan entered the recording studio for the first time. Duke Reid, the sound system boss, was looking for talent to record for his Treasure Isle record label. Morgan cut two popular shuffle-boogie sides “Lover Boy”, a.k.a. “S-Corner Rock”, and “Oh My”. Soon after, Morgan cut the bolero-tinged boogie “Fat Man”, which also became a hit. He also found time to record for Coxsone Dodd. In 1960 Morgan became the only artist ever to fill the places from one to seven on the Jamaican pop chart simultaneously.

Secret records are releasing a compilation of early tracks from the only artist ever to fill the places from one … More

Jamaican love songs always came across as heartfelt poetry whether they conveyed a broken heart, unrequited love or even the message, “it’s all over don’t bother to come back” anecdotes. But whatever the mood the singers of these songs were so good and versatile that putting such subject matter over in a few verses was always so moving and believable. Jamaican love songs were a constant in the ever-evolving sounds and journey that reggae music took its listeners on, from ska to rocksteady to the early reggae sounds of the late 1960s early 1970s.

Kingston Sounds have complied a great selection of songs that all deal with that timeless subject matter. New vinyl LP … More

Having dominated the rock steady era, Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid was searching for a way to build upon his standing as one of Jamaica’s premiere record producers following the arrival of the new reggae sound towards the close of the Sixties. By releasing Gay Jamaica Independence Time he proved that he still released high-quality tracks.

Some of the most talented musicians from that period are featured on this record, like U-Roy, The Ethiopians, Alton Ellis, … More

Eastwood Rides Again follows the theme of Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry & The Upsetters previous classic, Return of Django – and like that one, the groove isn’t just the rocksteady rhythms you’d expect – but also maybe this more spacious version of the style. They got their funk on with the inspiration of Spaghetti Westerns and soul music. The record is largely instrumental and its a representation of Perry’s significant production skills.

Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry was a pioneer in the 1970s development of dub music and worked together with artists such as … More

The famous Jamaican record producer Duke Reid founded record label Treasure Isle in the 1960s. Some of his best production skills can be found on the compilation album Here Comes The Duke. Showcasing the talents of some of the giants of the rock steady era, the recordings, all issued during the latter half of ’68, demonstrate just why the Duke is widely regarded as the king of the rock steady sound.

The famous Jamaican record producer Duke Reid founded record label Treasure Isle in the 1960s. Some of his best production … More

In the late 1960s, Decca was playing to its strengths – mass marketing classical and easy-listening recordings just as it had been doing since the late 1920s. In April of 1968, Decca entered into a venture that would see its repertoire prominently displayed by non-specialist retailers, and after much resistance, it moved into the world of budget releases, with the beginning of its much loved ‘The World Of’ series in 1968.

The World Of series acted as perfect primers, and the price put it at almost half the price of full-price … More

Born OTD in 1947, musician, songwriter and frontman guitarist of Mod band the Small Faces, Steve Marriott. Marriott was influenced from an early age by his heroes including Buddy Holly, Booker T & the MG’s, Ray Charles, Otis Redding, Muddy Waters and Bobby Bland. Limited 180 gm audiophile vinyl LP repressing of this album by the iconic British quartet featuring Steve Marriot, Ronnie Lane, Kenny Jones and Ian McLagan

The band is remembered as one of the most acclaimed and influential mod groups of the 1960s. Availabel in store … More

Pat Kelly out of all the Jamaican singers was influenced most by the voice of American soul singer Sam Cooke. As were indeed many of the singers from that time, few however could carry out this daunting task as well as Pat Kelly. His delivery was perfect and so was his ability to carry any song that came his way.

For this release we have focused on material that Mr. Kelly had recorded with legendary Jamaican producer Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee. … More

Once in a while, a man comes along who has the talent not only within one field, but many fields. Lee Perry is such a man. Singer, songwriter and producer. This album is a showcase for what this man is trying to say with his music. Defying convention time and again, Lee has spearheaded musical taste in Jamaica and once again, he comes up with new sounds and dances on this album… The Upsetter.

Classic Trojan album now reissued on vinyl. Originally released in 1969. Heavyweight 180gm vinyl. Available in store and online.