The Plague is Albert Camus’s world-renowned fable of fear and courage. The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they are forced into quarantine. Each person responds in their own way to the lethal disease: some resign themselves to fate, some seek blame, and a few, like Dr Rieux, resist the terror.

An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France’s suffering under … More

Born OTD in 1913, French philosopher, author, and journalist, Albert Camus. In this profound and moving philosophical statement, Camus poses the fundamental question: is life worth living? If human existence holds no significance, what can keep us from suicide? As Camus argues, if there is no God to give meaning to our lives, humans must take on that purpose themselves.

This is our ‘absurd’ task, like Sisyphus forever rolling his rock up a hill, as the inevitability of death constantly … More