Born OTD in 1834, British textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, William Morris. William Morris, the great 19th century craftsman, architect, designer, poet and writer, remains a monumental figure whose influence resonates powerfully today. As an intellectual (and author of the seminal utopian News From Nowhere), his concern with artistic and human values led him to cross what he called the ‘river of fire’ and become a committed socialist-committed not to some theoretical formula but to the day by day struggle of working women and men in Britain and to the evolution of his ideas about art, about work and about how life should be lived.

  Many of his ideas accorded none too well with the reforming tendencies dominant in the Labour movement, nor with…

A figure emerges from a painting to pursue a bitter vengeance; the last transmission of a dying man haunts the airwaves, seeking to reveal his murderer; a treasure hunt disturbs an ancient presence in the silence of a lost tomb… From the vaults of the British Library comes a new anthology celebrating the best works of forgotten, never since republished, supernatural fiction from the early 20th century.

Waiting within are malevolent spirits eager to possess the living and mysterious spectral guardians – a diverse host of phantoms…

Jamaican love songs always came across as heartfelt poetry whether they conveyed a broken heart, unrequited love or even the message, “it’s all over don’t bother to come back” anecdotes. But whatever the mood the singers of these songs were so good and versatile that putting such subject matter over in a few verses was always so moving and believable. Jamaican love songs were a constant in the ever-evolving sounds and journey that reggae music took its listeners on, from ska to rocksteady to the early reggae sounds of the late 1960s early 1970s.

Kingston Sounds have complied a great selection of songs that all deal with that timeless subject matter. New vinyl LP…

I am Not Sidney Poitier is a hilarious and irresistible take on race, class and identity. The sudden death of Not Sidney Poitier’s mother orphans him at age eleven. He is left with a name no one understands, an uncanny resemblance to an Oscar winning actor, and serious amount of shares in the Turner Corporation. Percival Everett’s novel follows Not Sidney’s tumultuous life, as the social hierarchy scrambles to balance his skin colour with his fabulous wealth..

Maturing under the less-than watchful eye of his adopted foster father, Ted Turner, Not Sidney learns to navigate a world…

Caroline Crampton was born on the Thames Estuary to parents who had sailed there from South Africa in the early 1980s. Having grown up with seafaring legs & a desire to explore, Caroline is both a knowledgeable guide to the most hidden-away parts of this overlooked & unfashionable part of the country, & a persuasive advocate for its significance, both historically & culturally. As one of the key entrances & exits to England, the estuary has been pivotal to London’s economic fortunes and in defining its place in the world.

As Caroline navigates the waters of the estuary, she also seeks out its stories: empty warehouses and arsenals; the Thames…

In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, central banks created trillions of dollars of new money, & poured it into financial markets. ‘Quantitative Easing’ (QE) was supposed to prevent deflation & restore economic growth. But the money didn’t go to ordinary people: it went to the rich, who didn’t need it. It went to big corporations & banks – the same banks whose reckless lending caused the crash. This led to a decade of stagnation, not recovery. QE failed.

In this book, Frances Coppola makes the case for a ‘people’s QE’, in which the money goes directly to ordinary…

Shouldn’t everyone receive a stake in society’s wealth? Could we create a fairer world by granting a guaranteed income to all? What would this mean for our health, wealth and happiness? Basic Income is a regular cash transfer from the state, received by all individual citizens. It is an acknowledgement that everyone plays a part in generating the wealth currently enjoyed only by a few. Political parties across the world are now adopting it as official policy and the idea generates headlines every day.

Guy Standing has been at the forefront of thought about Basic Income for the past thirty years, and in this…

The terrifying presence of a restless spirit on the top deck of a London bus; a possession at the bridge table on a cruise up the Nile; a nightmare encounter with druidic sacrifice in the innocuous setting of a terraced back garden . . . E F Benson’s “spook stories” pushed the boundaries of the ghost story tradition by exploring new, previously “out of bounds” settings–such as public transport and even hauntings by daylight–to frighten his readers from the 1890s to the 1930s. Benson delighted in twisting every idea and image and experimenting with the unexpected; this new collection of short stories from across his long career in writing draws together the most innovative, satisfyingly dark, and still resonant tales to thrill anew, and to give a clear picture of this playful master of the form, to whom many writers of supernatural fiction have been indebted.

This edition also features a detailed introduction containing the fascinating story of Benson’s life, and the never before-republished story “Billy…

Who owns England? Behind this simple question lies this country’s oldest & best-kept secret. This is the history of how England’s elite came to own our land, & an inspiring manifesto for how to open up our countryside once more. This book has been a long time coming. Since 1086, in fact. For centuries, England’s elite have covered up how they got their hands on millions of acres of our land, by constructing walls, burying surveys & more recently, sheltering behind offshore shell companies. But with the dawn of digital mapping & the Freedom of Information Act, it’s becoming increasingly difficult for them to hide.

Trespassing through tightly-guarded country estates, ecologically ravaged grouse moors and empty Mayfair mansions, writer and activist Guy Shrubsole has used…

Tim Quelch takes a nostalgic look back on a 60s childhood and early adulthood immersed in Sussex sport. Hastings United, Brighton & Hove Albion and Sussex County Cricket Club were his three great loves, his passion for football ignited by United’s plucky 1953/54 giant-killing side that came tantalisingly close to a fifth-round FA Cup clash with Arsenal. Later, Brighton secured Tim’s lasting loyalty when he witnessed their brave 1961 FA Cup battle with First Division champions Burnley.

That same year, Tim was captivated by explosive Sussex batsman Ted Dexter and mesmerised by West Indian fast bowler Wes…