The chant of ‘Azadi!’ – Urdu for ‘Freedom!’ – is the slogan of the freedom struggle in Kashmir against what Kashmiris see as the Indian Occupation. Ironically, it also became the chant of millions on the streets of India against the project of Hindu Nationalism. Even as Arundhati Roy began to ask what lay between these two calls for Freedom – a chasm or a bridge? – the streets fell silent. Not only in India, but all over the world. The Coronavirus brought with it another, more terrible understanding of Azadi, making a nonsense of international borders, incarcerating whole populations, & bringing the modern world to a halt like nothing else ever could. In this series of electrifying essays, Arundhati Roy challenges us to reflect on the meaning of freedom in a world of growing authoritarianism.

The essays include meditations on language, public as well as private, and on the role of fiction and alternative imaginations … More

Join TV biological anthropologist Professor Alice Roberts on a fascinating non-fiction journey to discover the secrets of our past, in this dramatic retelling of our human journey for children aged 7+ years. Adults who love Who Do You Think You Are? will enjoy reading and sharing this book with young ones. Reach back through time and shake hands with your ancestors.

Discover who we are, where we come from and even what it means to be human as you follow the … More

Illuminating her inner journey growing up mixed-race in Britain, Esua Jane Goldsmith’s unique memoir exposes the isolation & ambiguities that often come with being ‘an only’. Raised in 1950s South London & Norfolk with a white, working-class family, Esua’s education in racial politics was immediate & personal. From Britain & Scandinavia to Italy and Tanzania, she tackled inequality wherever she saw it, establishing an inspiring legacy in the Women’s lib & Black Power movements.

Plagued by questions of her heritage and the inability to locate all pieces of herself, she embarks on a journey … More

The Conquest of Bread is an 1892 book by the Russian anarcho-communist Peter Kropotkin. Originally written in French, it first appeared as a series of articles in the anarchist journal Le Révolté. It was first published in Paris with a preface by Élisée Reclus, who also suggested the title. Between 1892 and 1894, it was serialized in part in the London journal Freedom, of which Kropotkin was a co-founder. In the work, Kropotkin points out what he considers to be the defects of the economic systems of feudalism and capitalism and why he believes they thrive on and maintain poverty and scarcity.

He goes on to propose a more decentralized economic system based on mutual aid and voluntary cooperation, asserting that the … More

The must-read, pocket-sized Big Think book of 2020. It feels like the world is falling apart. So how do we keep hold of our optimism? How do we nurture the parts of ourselves that hope, trust & believe in something better? And how can we stay sane in this world of division? In this beautifully written & illuminating polemic, Booker Prize nominee Elif Shafak reflects on our age of pessimism, when emotions guide & misguide our politics, & misinformation & fear are the norm

A tender, uplifting plea for optimism, Shafak draws on her own memories and delves into the power of stories to … More

Orchards are so rich in biodiversity, they eclipse most recognised conservation areas. Spend a year in one orchard, and celebrate this imperilled, overlooked abundance of life. As rotting windfall apples and frost lie thick on the ground, and the oldest of fruit trees bend under the weight of mistletoe, the orchard begins a new year. A chattering blanket of starlings descend on the bounty of last year’s fruit, joining bramblings, blackbirds, angry-faced waxwings and intoxicated fieldfares who, drunk on fermented berries, fight one another over their rotting real estate. Even in winter, the orchard is a place of bounty, competition and continuous surprise, most of whose secrets lie hidden deep below the surface.

As the seasons turn, a wealth of animals and plants are revealed: Bumble and solitary bees apartment-hunting in April; spotted … More

The late Michael Brooks takes on the new “Intellectual Dark Web.” As the former host of The Michael Brooks Show and co-host of the Majority Report, he lets his understanding of the new media environment direct his analysis of the newly risen conservative rebels who have taken YouTube by storm.

Brooks provides a theoretically rigorous but accessible critique of the most prominent “renegades” including Sam Harris, Jordan Peterson, and Brett … More

The world has finally awoken to the reality of climate breakdown & ecological collapse. Now we must face up to its primary cause. Capitalism demands perpetual expansion, which is devastating the living world. There is only one solution that will lead to meaningful & immediate change: DEGROWTH. If we want to have a shot at halting the crisis, we need to restore the balance. We need to change how we see nature & our place in it, shifting from a philosophy of domination & extraction to one that’s rooted in reciprocity and regeneration.

We need to evolve beyond the dogmas of capitalism to a new system that is fit for the twenty-first century. … More

By law of trespass, we are excluded from 92 per cent of the land and 97 per cent of its waterways, blocked by walls whose legitimacy is rarely questioned. But behind them lies a story of enclosure, exploitation and dispossession of public rights whose effects last to this day. The Book of Trespass takes us on a journey over the walls of England, into the thousands of square miles of rivers, woodland, lakes and meadows that are blocked from public access.

By trespassing the land of the media magnates, Lords, politicians and private corporations that own England, Nick Hayes argues that … More

John Berger was one of the most influential thinkers & writers of postwar Europe. As a novelist, he won the Booker Prize in 1972, donating half his prize money to the Black Panthers; as a TV presenter he changed the way we looked at art in Ways of Seeing; as a storyteller & political activist he defended the rights & dignity of workers, migrants & the oppressed around the world. In 1953 he wrote: “Far from dragging politics into art, art has dragged me into politics.” He remained a revolutionary up to his death in January, 2017.

In A Writer of Our Time, Joshua Sperling places Berger’s life and works within the historical narrative of postwar Britain … More