Since her suicide in 1963 at the age of 30, Sylvia Plath has become a strange icon. This book addresses why this is the case and what this tells us about the way culture picks out important writers. The author argues that without a concept of fantasy we can understand neither Plath’s work nor what she has come to represent.

She proposes that no writer demonstrates more forcefully than Plath the importance of inner psychic life for the wider sexual … More

The First Fleet was the 11 ships that departed from Portsmouth, England, on 13 May 1787 to found the penal colony that became Australia. The Fleet consisted of two Royal Navy vessels, three store ships & six convict transports, carrying between 1,000 & 1,500 convicts, marines, seamen, civil officers & free people and a large quantity of stores.

In the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonize Australia. … More

Great illustrated guide for children who might wish to take part in the Big Garden Birdwatch 2019 #BigGardenBirdWatch. Celebrate the beautiful birds that can be spotted in British gardens in this exquisitely illustrated, cut-paper pop-up. Published in association with the RSPB, this 1.2-metre unfolding guide features a selection of more than 12 popular birds, including the robin, goldfinch and blue tit.

A beautifully illustrated pop-up book of favourite garden birds.  Presented in a stylish slipcase and stunningly illustrated by Lorna Syson, … More

Born OTD in 1925, French philosopher who wrote on philosophy, literature, film, and fine art, Gilles Deleuze. Deleuze was one of the most influential figures in 20th-century philosophy, well known for his works on the philosophy of art & for his master-works, Difference & Repetition and – with Felix Guattari – A Thousand Plateaus & Anti-Oedipus. Cinema I is the first volume of Deleuze’s revolutionary work on the theory of cinema

Drawing on the philosophy of Henri Bergson, Deleuze identified his work as “a logic of the cinema”, setting out to … More

Unlocking Sustainable Cities : A Manifesto for Real Change. This book is a manifesto for real urban change. Today, our urban areas are held back by corporate greed, loss of public space and rising inequality. This book highlights how cities are locked into unsustainable and damaging practices, and how exciting new routes can be unlocked for real change.

Across the world, city innovators are putting real sustainability into practice – from transforming abandoned public spaces and setting up … More

Born OTD in 1942, American professional boxer, activist, & philanthropist, Muhammad Ali. When Ali died, many mourned the life of the greatest sportsman the world had ever seen. In Redemption Song, Marqusee argues that Ali was not just a boxer but a remarkable political figure in a decade of tumultuous change. Playful, popular, always confrontational, Ali refashioned the role of a political activist & was central, alongside figures such as Malcolm X and MLK, to the black liberation & the anti-war movements.

The stunning new edition of Redemption Song by Mike Marqusee, includes a foreword by political sportswriter Dave Zirin. “One of … More

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism by the Canadian author and social activist Naomi Klein. Klein argues that neoliberal free market policies (as advocated by the economist Milton Friedman) have risen to prominence in some developed countries because of a deliberate strategy of “shock therapy”. This centers on the exploitation of national crises to push through controversial policies while citizens are too emotionally & physically distracted by disasters or upheavals to mount an effective resistance.

Exposing these global profiteers, Naomi Klein discovered information and connections that shocked even her about how comprehensively the shock doctors’ … More

Born OTD in 1933, American writer, filmmaker, philosopher, teacher, and political activist, Susan Sontag. Against Interpretation was Susan Sontag’s first collection of essays and made her name as one of the most incisive thinkers of our time. Sontag was among the first critics to write about the intersection between ‘high’ & ‘low’ art forms, & to give them equal value as valid topics, shown here in her epoch-making pieces ‘Notes on Camp’ &, ‘Against Interpretation’. Here too are impassioned discussions of Sartre, Camus, Simone Weil, Godard, Beckett, Levi-Strauss, science-fiction movies, psychoanalysis & contemporary religious thought.

Originally published in 1966, this collection has never gone out of print and has been a major influence on generations … More

Mod has its roots in in London with a group of young men in the late Fifties who were known as modernists because they listened to modern jazz. A Pocket Guide to Mod covers fashion including the use of the Union Flag and RAF roundel; music including bands such as The Who, Small Faces and Yardbirds who were associated with the music and locations such as The Eel Pie Island Hotel at Twickenham near London; amphetamines, the mod drug of choice that fuelled marathon all-night dancing; and scooters including Vespas and Lambrettas often highly customised.

Available in store and online.