Here Comes Everybody, subtitled ‘An Introduction to James Joyce for the Ordinary Reader’, was commissioned by Joyce’s own publishers, Faber and Faber, in 1963. Burgess’s original title was ‘James Joyce and the Common Man’, and he introduces the book with a provocative statement: ‘If ever there was a writer for the people, Joyce was that writer.’ Here Comes Everybody was Burgess’s third non-fiction book, following in the wake of English Literature: A Survey for Students (1958) and Language Made Plain (1964). Written between January and August 1964, Here Comes Everybody was published in 1965. The American edition, published by Norton in the same year, was retitled Re Joyce. The book was widely reviewed on publication, and it quickly established itself as a useful guide to Joyce’s work.

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Burgess divides Here Comes Everybody into three sections. The discussion proceeds chronologically, taking in each of Joyce’s early published works (there are chapters on Chamber Music, Dubliners, Exiles, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Stephen Hero) before devoting longer sections to each of Joyce’s more substantial books: Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. Each chapter offers guidance for deciphering Joyce’s mythological allusions, images and omnilingual experimental writing. Some of this material is drawn from commentators such as Stuart Gilbert and Frank Budgen, although Burgess does not take much trouble to acknowledge his sources. Available online.

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